Ireland 22 France 25 – The Ratings

first_imgNEW PLYMOUTH, NEW ZEALAND – JUNE 12: Gordon D’Arcy of Ireland scores a try during the International rugby test match between the New Zealand All Blacks and Ireland at Yarrow Stadium on June 12, 2010 in New Plymouth, New Zealand. (Photo by Phil Walter/Getty Images) So near but yet so far for Ireland as they battled back from 25-15 down but couldn’t quite land the killer punch at the death, writes Rugby World writer Katie FieldIrelandLuke Fitzgerald 65Some good moments, including a disallowed try in the first two minutes, but often too lateral in attack.Fergus McFadden 60Took the first try well, and helped create it, but mishandled a couple of times in the hurly burly of Test rugby.Brian O’Driscoll 70Some great touches and good leadership to rally his troops after they fell behind.Gordon D’Arcy 58Some good contributions to Ireland’s attacks but D’Arcy (below) missed a tackle which let in France for their try.Keith Earls 60First half mistakes were counter-balanced by a fine attacking run and chip late in the game.Jonathan Sexton 75Slick passing, running and linking in open play but missed a relatively simple conversion just before half time.Tomas O’Leary 60Scored a good try but was let down by a few individual errors and was occasionally ponderous at the base of the ruck.Cian Healy 67Good in the set-pieces and won some notable turnovers.Rory Best 64Solid in the set-pieces.Mike Ross 70His break helped create Ireland’s second try and his set piece work was mostly efficient.Donncha O‘Callaghan 62Gave away the penalty which gave France the lead for the first time but also contributed well at scrum and lineout time. 90 – A personal best – his greatest game ever100 – Faultless – no one could play a better game in this position Paul O’Connell 62A solid performance but nothing spectacular.Sean O‘Brien 71Great handling skills and provided plenty of go-forward.David Wallace 70Helped create Ireland’s first try and always made a few yards and recycled possession successfully.Jamie Heaslip 73An eye-catching return to the Ireland team – sound under the high ball, strong in the tackle and scored the final try.The ScorersIRELAND – Tries: Fergus McFadden, Tomas O’Leary, Jamie Heaslip. Cons: Jonathan Sexton, Ronan O’Gara. Pen: SextonFRANCE – Try: Maxime Medard. Con: Dimitri Yachvili. Pens: Morgan Parra (five), Yachvili (one).THE KEY0 – Should never play for this team again10 – Shocker – lucky to get picked again this season20 – Out of his depth30 – Did one or two things right – must improve40 – Willing but woeful50 – Minimum requirement for a professional – average60 – Solid effort and a decent performance70 – Made key contributions and guaranteed his place for next time80 – Superb – should give himself a pat on the back LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Saints and sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgFOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE Respect: Nathan Hughes and Henry Slade slap hands during the meeting of last season’s Premiership finalists (Getty)Bellissimo!Italy’s two professional clubs, Benetton Treviso and Zebre, regularly get a kicking from the media and fans alike for their poor results. So how refreshing to see both sides win at the weekend.Treviso backed up their shock success at Edinburgh with a 16-6 defeat of the Ospreys on home soil, while Zebre stunned Southern Kings with a six-try, 43-17 triumph at Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium. Four matches into the Guinness Pro14 season and Michael Bradley’s ‘no-hopers’ are looking down on the Ospreys.Perfect start: Treviso celebrate Braam Steyn’s second-minute try against the Ospreys (Inpho)Trinder boxThere were some super long-range, counter-attacking tries across the English and Celtic leagues. Lee Jones’s for Glasgow against Munster, Josh Bassett’s for Wasps at Exeter, and Will Talbot-Davies’s for the Dragons at Ulster all stood out.But pride of place has to go to Billy Twelvetrees’s score for Gloucester against Worcester. The try was almost entirely down to Henry Trinder’s dazzling run that combined beautiful footwork and body deception, a shrewd speed adjustment to wait for support, and a final over-the-shoulder offload to Twelvetrees having received a return pass from Willi Heinz.“If Beauden Barrett had conjured such a try, we would be hailing it as an example of All Black brilliance,” said Sir Clive Woodward.Johan Ackermann, Gloucester’s new head coach, is preaching the same ‘no fear’ message that brought him success with the Lions franchise in South Africa. Who knows where Gloucester will end up this season but they should certainly be good to watch.Barrett-esque: Henry Trinder produced a moment of magic in Gloucester’s victory over WorcesterWarriors step it upDave Rennie is another southern hemisphere coach starting out in British rugby and his Glasgow Warriors side produced plenty of razzle-dazzle in beating Munster 37-10 at Scotstoun.It was a match where tensions spilled over and after a mass scuffle in the 18th minute, referee Nigel Owens summoned both teams together to deliver a firm warning about their conduct. Top refereeing that nipped the problem in the bud.Ali Price is looking really sharp and if, as expected, he supplants the France-based Greig Laidlaw as his country’s No 9, then Scotland will be in need of a new permanent goalkicker.Finn Russell has done a decent job since Laidlaw got injured during the Six Nations and his faultless display off the tee against Munster took him to a new Pro12/14 record – 16 out of 16 kicks at the start of a league campaign surpasses the 15 achieved by Dan Biggar in 2014. The SaintsSlade the bladeIn 14 of his 20 Tests as England’s head coach, Eddie Jones has chosen Owen Farrell and Jonathan Joseph as his centre combination. Luther Burrell, Elliot Daly and Ben Te’o have all had a go in the 13 shirt but Joseph has been his go-to man – up until now.The only other player given a start at 13 is Henry Slade, who paired up with Alex Lozowski and then Piers Francis outside George Ford in this summer’s tour to Argentina – giving England three genuine playmakers.With so many England regulars unavailable because of the Lions tour, that was by necessity a tour of experiment. It will be fascinating to see how much that impressive 2-0 series win impacts upon selection this autumn.TV pundit David Flatman called the 24-year-old Slade “by head and shoulders the best player of the weekend” and it appears that the Exeter player is getting back to the form he showed prior to December 2015, when he broke his leg against Wasps.Rugby World called for Slade to be the first name on England’s team sheet at the start of the Jones era. There’s nothing he can’t do and that includes the physical stuff. Things have moved on but two years after the world looked his oyster, Slade – who has a ludicrously low seven caps – could come again.Class act: Henry Slade won Man of the Match as Exeter saw off Wasps 31-17 at Sandy Park (Getty)Right prioritiesBilly Vunipola’s injury (see below) brought an added edge to the battle of the No 8s at Sandy Park, Sam Simmonds v Nathan Hughes. Sadly, the contest never really materialised because Simmonds was hurt tackling his adversary early in the game and was carried off.It was wonderful to see Hughes’s instant concern and care for Simmonds, ensuring he stayed still and in a safe position in case of potential neck damage. Rob Baxter praised Hughes’s “fantastic reaction” during his in-match comments to BT Sport commentator Nick Mullins. Wycherley clattered into the head of Tim Swinson and the only thing you can say in his defence is that, as a 19-year-old starting out in Pro14 rugby, he was trying too hard to make a physical impact. He will learn.Red card: Munster’s Fineen Wycherley (right) is sent off by Nigel Owens (Inpho) The episode followed a similar misfortune for Bath’s Sam Underhill at Franklin’s Gardens. The law is designed to stop teams potentially bringing on players for ‘injured’ team-mates for tactical reasons, but the past two weeks have shown the flaw in the law.Bath and Gloucester have both been reduced to 14 men after a player of theirs sustained a serious injury. It’s not right and surely this anomaly needs addressing.Hold your horses: Ed Slater was prevented from replacing Tom Savage because of a law anomalyA spate of injuries2017 will be a year to forget for Billy Vunipola. The Saracens and England No 8 missed most of the Six Nations with a knee injury, and then the Lions tour with a shoulder problem. Now he won’t be seen again in anger until 2018 after suffering a knee injury against Sale that required surgery.Rugby is a tough old sport and these things happen. Injury-enforced absences are almost inevitable for a pro player and, in the long term, can help prolong a career by sparing the body the usual weekly wear and tear.Stricken: Billy Vunipola limps off against Sale and faces a race to make the Six Nations (Getty)However, the attrition rate this season has been something else. So much so, in fact, that Bath have postponed tonight’s A League match with Harlequins because they can’t raise a side. They have at least 16 players unavailable because of injury or concussion.Such a casualty rate makes a mockery of Premiership Rugby’s proposal to extend the domestic season until the end of June, a plan they want introduced from the start of the 2019-20 campaign.Reducing the off-season by a month looks like madness and this ironic tweet by Bath prop Max Lahiff reflects the view of many. Henry Slade shines as Chiefs power on, Nathan Hughes’s act of kindness, Finn Russell’s perfect 16, Matt Banahan chasing a record and Barrett-esque magic from Henry Trinder TAGS: Highlight Flying Saint: Ahsee Tuala collides with the corner flag during Northampton’s 40-25 win at London Irish Russell, who celebrated his 25th birthday on Saturday, even had a bashed-up nose while he did it after he collided with Tyler Bleyendaal just before half-time.In charge: Nigel Owens with assistant referees Lloyd Linton and Keith Allen at Scotstoun (Inpho)Banahan’s targetBath’s Matt Banahan is closing in on a little-known record – the most Premiership tries scored by a player on one ground.Banahan’s try that sparked a 32-point blitz against Newcastle – before the Falcons remarkably hit back to win – was his 40th at the Rec in league action. Only two men can better that.Leicester’s Neil Back scored 42 at Welford Road from 1997-2005 while James Simpson-Daniel heads the list with 44 at Kingsholm from 2001-13.It’s only a matter of time before Banahan, a better player now than when he won his 16 England caps under Martin Johnson, puts Sinbad in the shade.Matt finish: Matt Banahan scores his 40th Premiership at the Rec (out of 53) but Falcons won 33-32The SinnersRough justiceLittle in life is simple and that includes rugby’s injury replacement laws. Currently, a substituted player may only return to the field if replacing either an injured front-row, a player with a blood injury, a player having a Head Injury Assessment (HIA) or a player injured as a result of foul play.When Gloucester’s Tom Savage took a blow to the head after a crunching tackle by Worcester’s Christian Scotland-Williamson, the incident fitted none of those criteria. Savage was clearly not going to play any further part in the game, so Gloucester’s attempt to interpret Savage’s injury as an HIA didn’t wash. Ed Slater, keen to run back on as a replacement for the closing seven minutes, was sent back to the bench. Shoulder bargesSenseless shoulder barges at opponents in the ruck have not yet been wiped out, despite the red-card sanctions that are regularly applied.Edinburgh’s Michele Rizzo was sent off at Scarlets for such an offence, but far worse was Fineen Wycherley’s action at Glasgow that earned the Munster forward a red from Nigel Owens. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

2021 Six Nations Injuries Update

first_imgAll the latest news on players injured throughout this year’s Six Nations Championship LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Six Nations Table 2021 — Leinster Rugby (@leinsterrugby) February 25, 2021Scrum-half Conor Murray missed the matches against France and Italy after suffering a hamstring injury, but is expected to be fit to play Scotland in round four.Following the Italy match, Jordan Larmour (hip), Tadhg Furlong (ankle), Dave Kilcoyne (HIA) and Ronan Kelleher (ankle) are being assessed by the Ireland medical team.Related: Ireland Six Nations Squad Great to see @caelan_doris making progress and taking part in a restricted training programme this week #LeinsterRugby pic.twitter.com/SA5DKinxR0 The highs and lows of Rugby…I have loved every second of training and playing in an England shirt and it has been a dream come true to be involved in such a great group of lads and coaches. I’m truly gutted with the way it ended on Saturday but these things happen… pic.twitter.com/gbnQ4V4HLN— Jack Willis (@jackswillis7) February 15, 2021Uncapped Bristol scrum-half Harry Randall (ankle) and experienced Northampton lock Courtney Lawes (pectoral) have also been ruled out for the rest of the championship after picking up injuries in training. Take a look at what games are being… 2021 Six Nations Injuries UpdateAll eyes are on the 2021 Six Nations and while we debate who could win it all, whether a Grand Slam is on and who is in red hot British & Irish Lions form there is the perpetual issue: who has the healthiest squad?Every season players drop out, so here is a rolling update of the major injuries for each team.2021 Six Nations InjuriesEnglandJack Willis suffered a serious knee injury in the win over Italy as he was cleared out at a ruck. The back-row was taken off on a stretcher and has subsequently had surgery. Rest up, @Courtney_Lawes The forward will undergo surgery on an injury sustained in England training last week.— Northampton Saints (@SaintsRugby) March 3, 2021Related: England Six Nations SquadFranceRather than injuries, it’s Covid-19 that has caused the most disruption in the French squad and led to the postponement of their third-round match against Scotland.Ahead of the scheduled Scotland fixture, Demba Bamba was recalled to the France squad having recovered from a hamstring problem, but reports in France suggest he is likely to miss the remainder of the championship having suffered another injury while training at home. Expand Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations…center_img Six Nations TV Coverage 2021: BBC and ITV Matches Enjoyed the creativity of this little nudge by Callum Sheedy once in behind the English defence. Nearly sits up for Kieran Hardy [gets injured here], one of a couple of occasions of good cover by Anthony Watson. pic.twitter.com/aulkSD3xoa— Murray Kinsella (@Murray_Kinsella) March 2, 2021Scarlets star Josh Macleod was due to win his first cap against Scotland but ruptured his Achilles tendon in training and is now likely to be out for six months.Related: Wales Six Nations SquadThis post will be updated throughout the Six Nations. Demba Bamba probably out of the reckoning for the rest of the Six Nations after picking up an injury exercising at home https://t.co/p0mZ60MB58— James Harrington (@Jamesonrugby) March 2, 2021Related: France Six Nations SquadIreland Caelan Doris is set to miss the entire championship after coach Andy Farrell said the back-rower would be “out for the foreseeable future” with concussion symptoms but he has started to make a limited return to training with Leinster. ItalyA dislocated finger ruled Italy scrum-half Stephen Varney out of the Ireland match but he is back in the squad ahead of their fourth-round fixture against Wales.However, prop Cherif Traore will miss the rest of the championship after breaking his arm against Ireland.Related: Italy Six Nations SquadScotlandCentre Cameron Redpath wasn’t part of the squad selected for the France match, which was subsequently postponed, due to a neck problem while back-rowers Gary Graham and Blade Thomson also returned to their clubs because of injury.Related: Scotland Six Nations SquadWalesDan Lydiate was released from the squad and ruled out of the championship due to an anterior cruciate ligament injury sustained in Wales’ opening match against Ireland. He has subsequently undergone surgery.Hamstring injuries have been causing problems for the scrum-halves. Tomos Williams suffered a hamstring injury in the game against Ireland and missed both the Scotland and England fixtures but could return to face Italy, especially after Kieran Hardy was ruled out for the rest of the championship. One of the try-scorers in the win over England, Hardy damaged his hamstring in that match. Six Nations TV Coverage 2021: BBC and ITV Matches Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Collapse Six Nations Table 2021 Scrum-half Kieran Hardy has been ruled out of Wales’ last two matches with a hamstring injury (Getty Images) Expand Who is leading the way in the Six…last_img read more

Reunion Trienal de mujeres: Latinas de Los Estados Unidos y…

first_img Revda. Suyapa Rodriguez says: Featured Events Reunion Trienal de mujeres: Latinas de Los Estados Unidos y en la IX Provincia Comments (2) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Latin America, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Province IX Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Revda. Suyapa Rodriguez says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing July 10, 2012 at 10:05 pm Representante de la IX Provincia en ECW Por tres años mañana miercoles estare entregandole a mi sucesora a la 11 de la mañana. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Mujeres Episcopales representantes de la 9na Provincia, incluye delegadas de Honduras, Puerto Rico, Ecuador, Venezuela y República Dominicana. Photo/Araceli Ma[Episcopal News Service – Indianápolis] En el marco de la 77ª  Convención General se lleva a cabo la 47ma  reunión trienal de Mujeres de la Iglesia Episcopal (ECW) por sus siglas en ingles;  bajo el tema: “Muchos caminos, un solo viaje” se reúnen cerca de 300 mujeres que representan al ECW de sus respectivas diócesis.Encontramos a las mujeres latinas líderes representando a las diócesis de Honduras: Rvda. Lourdes del Carmen Herrera y Rvda. Suyapa Rodríguez, Ecuador Litoral: Elizabeth Calderón, Puerto Rico: Zoraida Maldonado y Ana Zapata Cruz, Republica Dominicana: Mayra Brown y María Rodríguez y de Venezuela: Coromoto Jiménez de Salazar. La Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias (UTO) por sus siglas en Ingles, trae como representante de la IX provincia a Olga Arévalo, de la diócesis de Ecuador Litoral.Una representante de la delegación de Honduras no pudo asistir a esta importante reunión porque se le negó la visa para viajar a Estados Unidos; otro importante obstáculo para muchas delegaciones es el esfuerzo económico que significa un viaje de esta magnitud desde América Latina a Estados Unidos.Representando la diversidad de Estado Unidos  en la Iglesia Episcopal, encontramos a Ema Rossero y Lisa Fortuna que vienen de la Diócesis de Massachusetts y a Petra Barragan de la Diócesis de los Ángeles. Ellas reconocen una incipiente representación de las latinas en las diócesis de los Estados Unidos en la institución de las Mujeres Episcopales pero aun quieren ver más mujeres afroamericanas, asiáticas y latinas. “Así como es nuestra iglesia”, agrega Rossero.El sábado 7 una mujer de cada diócesis recibió un reconocimiento público de la institución, en la Provincia IX fue premiada  Verónica Flowers de Honduras, por su ejemplo de vida para su iglesia  y Melva Clavell de la Diócesis de Puerto Rico por su activa participación en diversos ministerios. Así mismo de la Diócesis de Nueva York premiaron a la Latina María Dawson por su permanente labor con las Mujeres Episcopales; Dawson  lideró el equipo de traductores de la “Misión de Médicos en el Salvador”.La reunión además de revisar asuntos internos ha programado el Taller “Mujeres en el Siglo XXI”. “No hay mejor ejemplo que la Iglesia Episcopal empodera a las mujeres porque aquí en la Iglesia Episcopal ocupan cargos de liderazgo como la Presidencia de los Obispos, la Presidencia de la Cámara de Diputados, tenemos varias obispas mujeres y por supuesto ordenamos las mujeres Sacerdotes”, dice con orgullo Elizabeht Calderón la representante del Ecuador Litoral. Paralelamente, hay casos como el de  Venezuela donde la ordenación de mujeres todavía es un tema visto con reservas por otras denominaciones y por misma población. “En Latinoamérica todavía es necesario trabajar con un pensamiento machista tanto en hombres como en mujeres”, nos comenta la representante de Venezuela Coromoto Jiménez.Las mujeres de la IX Provincia se sienten bienvenidas a la trienal y agradecen la traducción simultánea de las sesiones, pero sienten aun la barrera del idioma porque los materiales escritos no están en su idioma.Pero no todo el trabajo se concentra en la trienal; algunas delegadas nos explicaron acerca de los programas que adelantan en sus respectivos países:Puerto Rico: Organizan el “almuerzo de azul” anualmente, un retiro de cuaresma en dos lugares distintos, una convención anual y mantienen el Hogar de niños San Miguel.Honduras: Estamos dando capacitación en manualidades, en trabajo con lana y talleres de autoestima, nos estamos enfocando en la capacitación de nuestras mujeres. Organizamos ventas de comida para nuestros fondos y dos veces al año hacemos la recolección para UTO.Venezuela: Trabajamos en conjunto con las otras pastorales de la Iglesia, tenemos proyectos con la Pastoral del VIH, con la de no violencia contra la mujer y la familia, mantenemos un prescolar que atiende a niños hasta los dieciocho años, en coordinación con alcaldías y con organizaciones no gubernamentales prestamos la infraestructura de nuestras iglesias y casas parroquiales para prestar servicios de salud y enviamos donaciones a las zonas indígenas de San Fabiano y San Agustín.— Araceli Ma es integrante del equipo del Episcopal News Service en la Convención General. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Por Araceli MaPosted Jul 9, 2012 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 10, 2012 at 10:00 pm Gracias Araceli, Dios la Bendiga en su trabajo.Revda. Suyapa Rodriguez.representante de la IX en ECW Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

New Zealand: Doctrine commission will examine same-sex blessings

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Taonga staffPosted Feb 15, 2013 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 [Anglican Taonga] A doctrinal commission will be set up to look at a theological rationale for the liturgical blessing of people in permanent, faithful same-sex relationships.This “Commission on Doctrine and Theological questions” is being convened at the instruction of General Synod Standing Committee, which met in Auckland last week.The commission, which flows directly from the fourth and final Hermeneutic Hui in Auckland’s Holy Trinity Cathedral this month, will also look at the implications of such blessings on the ordination of people in same-sex relationships.That reflects the feeling, expressed several times during the hui, that the ordination question will sort itself out if and when the blessing question is settled.In other words, if the church arrives at a point where it is ready to bless the unions of same-sex couples, then ordaining people in such relationships may automatically follow.At Standing Committee’s request, the general secretary of the province, the Rev. Michael Hughes, has now written to the three tikanga secretaries – the Rev. Sereima Lomaloma, Charles Hemana and Elizabeth Smaal (Tikanga Pasefika, Maori and Pakeha, respectively) – about setting up the new commission.He’s requesting the secretaries to ask their respective tikanga standing committees to appoint three members to that new commission.Several speakers at the last Hermeneutic Hui had floated the idea of a theological hui on marriage, but Standing Committee opted for the commission route instead.The Ma Whea Commission will need to be briefed on all the doctrinal questions before constructing its report to next year’s General Synod, and Standing Committee probably felt that a tightly focused team of theologians from each tikanga would better serve this timeline.The new doctrinal commission will also make its findings available to the wider church for response, before supplying both its report and those responses to Standing Committee and the Ma Whea Commission by the end of this year.Archbishop David Moxon says the Standing Committee spent some time honing the resolution, which is outlined at the foot of this story. The final wording was accepted “because of its balance and care.”Key theological positionsImmediately after the Hermeneutic Hui, members of the Ma Whea Commission met with the Church Reference Group which has been appointed to support it.At that meeting the Ma Whea Commission asked the reference group to collate and summarize the key theological positions represented in all the papers delivered at the four hermeneutic hui, begining in August 2007.The reference group appointed three of its members – the Rev. Sue Patterson; the Ven. Lynda Patterson, and Karen Spoelstra – to undertake that task.Those three women will seek to answer four questions:1. What is the theological common ground? (between the liberal and conservative positions).2. What are the theological differences?3. Where might there be potential for reconciliation?4. Where will be the areas of ongoing disagreement?The Patterson/Spoelstra group has undertaken to supply its précis to the Ma Whea Commission by June 1 this year.• • • •In his letter to the three tikanga secretaries, the general secretary says he has been asked by General Synod Standing Committee to convene a ‘Commission on Doctrine and Theological Questions’, as per Title B/Canon XVII, to consider and report on the question – ‘what is a theological rationale for a Christian approach to the blessing and marriage of people in permanent, faithful same gender relationships given the implications thereof on the ordination of people in same gender relationships.’The full resolution on the Commission on Doctrine and Theological Questions reads:1-  That this General Synod Standing Committee (GSSC) receives the biblical and theological work of all the Hermeneutics Hui;2-  That this GSSC notes a recommendation at the fourth and final Hui, encouraging the Church to make enquiry into the theological rationale for a Christian approach to the blessing and marriage of people in permanent, faithful same gender relationships, with a view to assessing such rationale in this Church;3-  That this GSSC asks the General  Secretary to convene the Commission on Doctrine and Theological Questions under Canon B/XVII, for the purpose of exploring the theological rationale above given the implications thereof on the ordination of people in same gender relationships;4-  That the Doctrine Commission seeks the discernment of members of this Church in response to its work and reports such work and its responses to the GSSC and the Ma Whea? Commission by the end of 2013.The General Secretary’s letter to tikanga secretaries adds:“That Canon requires me to ask each of you to approach respectively your Standing Committee, Runanga Whaiti, and IDCCG each to appoint three members to constitute this Commission for this purpose.”“If you could consider this request at your next meetings, please, and advise me thereafter. I will seek to convene the Commission to begin its work as soon as practicable.” New Zealand: Doctrine commission will examine same-sex blessings Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Same-Sex Blessings Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Human Sexuality, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

Racial justice work is highlight of proposed 2016-2018 budget

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ david myers says: Block grants, whose use is decided by the recipient with audits and progress reports required. For example, $1.5 million is budgeted for the Dioceses of Alaska, Navajoland, North Dakota, and South Dakota to enhance work with indigenous populations. Those grants represent an increase over the current triennium. The budget includes its traditional grant to historically black colleges, which is a slightly lower $ 1.6 million. However, there is an additional $400,000 to be divided between the two colleges (St. Augustine’s College in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Voorhees College in Denmark, South Carolina) as development grants, increasing the total granting by $20,000 Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls New initiatives grants for experimental approaches to building up the body of Christ. Racial Justice and Reconciliation is such a grant. Rector Shreveport, LA Racial justice work is highlight of proposed 2016-2018 budget Committee proposes to reduce diocesan asking to 15 percent over three years Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 1, 2015 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA $300,000 training in the use of the church’s Title IV clergy disciplinary canons (line 281b).Lloyd and Lane said they were extremely appreciative that so many resolutions with funding implications began moving through convention very early, thus helping the committee’s budget process.“The hardest thing in an operating budget is to reserve funds for new work and I am particularly gratified that Program, Budget and Finance has been creative and aggressive in seeking ways to pool resources and so this budget does have significant new work in it in the midst of trying to be true to the program and structure of The Episcopal Church,” Lane said.Any changes in that structure enacted by General Convention “might mean that Executive Council will have to take the budget that we pass and rework it to a greater extent than it ever has had to before,” Lloyd acknowledged.PB&F had to operate under the current canons, she said, and could not anticipate canonical changes.“We knew all along that even if restructuring had passed on Day 2, the canons wouldn’t take effect until Jan. 1 so we had to produce a budget based on the old canonical model,” she said.The committee said in a narrative it presented along with the budget spreadsheet that it is grateful that: PB&F members were involved in creating the process Executive Council used to develop its draft budget; how members were welcomed into every council meeting; and how council shared the feedback it solicited from the church at large.“The collaborative approach taken by Executive Council produced a cogent and balanced budget,” the committee said in its narrative. “However, a budget so tightly balanced does not permit easy changes. Large allocations in response to legislation are even harder to come by.”PB&F’s narrative suggests that council consider allocating an undesignated block of $2 million to $5 million in its 2019-2021 draft budget to give PB&F greater flexibility in responding to “the needs and the priorities of the General Convention.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (1) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC $1.2 million as the church’s contribution to the Anglican Communion Office, an increase of $500,000 (line 193). Press Release Service Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 $1.1 million (an increase of $257,357) for renamed line 281a, (formerly called Committees, Commissions, Agencies and Boards, and now named Interim Bodies). The budget assumes a one-third reduction in the number of interim bodies, and a one-third reduction in the number of members on each but increases the funding available for face-to-face meetings. Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 General Convention 2015, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Racial Justice & Reconciliation Comments are closed. Special purpose grants for specific programs with a purpose and plan. For instance, the current triennium’s $3 million in Mission Enterprise Zones and New Church Starts grants are examples of these grants. The proposed budget increases their funding by $1 million.Other highlights in the budget:$750,000 for digital evangelism has been added to the communication budget in response to Presiding Bishop-elect Michael Curry’s commitment to evangelism (line 53b). July 2, 2015 at 10:16 am c019 calls on the church to respond to “systemic racial injustice”; really? The only reference to this injustice is the shootings of african-american men . i assume meaning Ferguson etc. it fails to mention that the men were criminals participating in a criminal act. where is any other “systemic racial injustice? we have a black president and now a black bishop.the church appears to have become a secular organ for leftist politics. further evidence of this is Bishop schori stating that ” global warming denial is immoral” Scientist don’t even agree on global warming so if you are skeptical you are immoral. how arrogant! the church is sick probably terminal. Program Budget & Finance, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC General Convention, Central New York deputy Chuck Stewart studies the budget, with fellow deputy the Rev. Georgina Hegney. Photo: Tracy Sukraw/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] The Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) July 1 proposed a budget for The Episcopal Church in the 2016-2018 triennium that includes a major new $2 million initiative on racial justice and reconciliation, even as it reduces the amount of money it asks dioceses to contribute to 15 percent by 2018.The 2016-2018 triennial budget is based on $122,259,959 in revenue, compared to a forecasted $118,243,102 for triennium that ends Dec. 31 of this year. The committee projected expenses of $122,189,125. Thus, the proposed budget comes in with a surplus of $70,834, a figure that the committee in the budget document called “negligible in view of the multiple forecasts in a three-year budget.”The committee presented the budget to a joint session on July 1. Both the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies must approve the budget, agreeing on any changes supported by one house or the other.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori called the session to prayer. “We are gathered here to consider how best to use the resources you have given us for the work of your healed world. Keep us open in heart and mind and spirit that we may discern the leading of your spirit.”Diocese of Maine Bishop Stephen Lane, PB&F vice chair, told the joint session that the budget process, jointly designed by PB&F and Executive Council, was “collaborative and friendly [and] … was good for PB&F and good for the church.”The budget is available as a PDF here in English and Spanish.The impetus for the budget’s racial justice and reconciliation initiative came from Resolution C019 that calls on the church to respond to systemic racial injustice. It asks for $1.2 million for that work.“It was the sense of the (PB&F) committee that given the atmosphere we’re living in now the shootings and the plight of African-American men, that we wanted to do more,” the Rev. Mally Lloyd of Massachusetts, PB&F chair, told ENS the day before the budget was presented. “Give them $2 million and a blank slate to really try something new for the church that we hope will have major impact.”Lloyd said the committee decided to leave the dimensions of the work “for the movement of the spirit” to guide the church’s leaders.The $2 million will come from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s short-term reserves and is part of the $4.7 million surplus with which the 2013-2015 triennium is predicted to end.“We’re taking a risk as a church that we don’t have an emergency that would call on those reserves,” Lane told ENS. “We’re seeing this as an extraordinary circumstance and an extraordinary opportunity and, therefore using extraordinary means to support it.”Income assumptionsThe budget assumes $76.6 million in commitments from the church’s dioceses (line 2), about $2.1 million more than was projected in the current triennium. Nearly 62 percent of the budget’s revenue comes from pledges by the church’s dioceses and regional mission areas. The actual diocesan giving in the current triennium is forecast to amount to $79.3 million.Massachusetts deputy Sarah Neumann studies the budget via the virtual binder on her iPad. Photo: Tracy Sukraw/Episcopal News ServiceEach year’s annual giving in the three-year budget is based on a diocese’s income two years earlier, minus $120,000. Those entities are currently asked annually to contribute 19 percent of their income from two years earlier, minus $120,000.PB&F’s proposed budget increases that exemption to $150,000. Its revenue projection is based on asking the church’s dioceses and regional mission areas to give 18 percent of their income to fund the 2016 budget, 16.5 percent for the 2017 budget and 15 percent in 2018.Lloyd and Lane said that PB&F felt the Executive Council’s draft 2016-2018 triennium budget was based on solid research when it came to predicting how diocesan giving would respond to a reduced asking. Lane said he and Ohio Bishop Mark Hollingsworth, who chaired the council committee that drafted the budget given to PB&F, also conducted an informal poll of bishops whose diocese did not meet the 19 percent asking.“We found complete support for the 15 percent goal,” he said. “We found substantial commitment on the part of those below 15 percent to move in that direction over the triennium. I have confidence that the 15 percent objective is solidly supported by the bishops of the church.”Lloyd added that she believed there are some dioceses “for whom this 15 percent will never be reachable.” However, she said, council’s planned Diocesan Assessment Review Committee will help those dioceses’ “realistic” percentage contributions be seen as “full participation” in funding the church-wide budget, rather than feeling penalized and criticized for not paying the full asking.The budget’s revenue is calculated on the assumption that the approximately one-third of the dioceses that pay 19 percent or more will decrease their contributions to match the annual asking, as will those who now pay between 19 and 15 percent.Those dioceses that give less than 15 percent are predicted to increase their annual giving by a minimum of 10 percent of their giving each year. Thus if a diocese is paying 9 percent, it will increase its giving in the first year to 9.9 percent and so forth.The diocesan commitments revenue projection is also based on income earned at the diocesan level growing by a half percent, according to the notes in line 1.Despite pending resolutions calling for the assessment to drop to 15 percent immediately, Lloyd said the committee rejected such requests early on. “We felt it was too deep a drop too quickly and it would present the new presiding bishop with some tough choices to make that didn’t seem fair his first year,” she said.The diocesan asking is not a canonically mandated assessment and the Task Force for Reimagining The Episcopal Church called in its final report for such a move. The House of Deputies considered substitute Resolution D013 (which would take the place of its original version and those of A008, A110 and A111) and would, among other things, change the voluntary diocesan asking to a mandatory assessment. PB&F does not have the authority to make the asking mandatory.Out of 109 dioceses and three regional areas, 49 dioceses paid the full asking or more in 2014. A list of 2013 diocesan commitments and payments made, and 2014 commitments, is here.The budget revenue also includes a 5 percent draw, or dividend, on the income from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s approximately $220 million in unrestricted invested assets. The draw amounts to $28.2 million, compared with $24.5 million anticipated in the current triennium (line 3).In addition to diocesan payments, the 5 percent draw and the short-term reserves draw for the racial justice program, other major income line items include nearly $10 million in rental income from The Episcopal Church Center, $2.1 million from Episcopal Migration Ministries’ refugee loan collection program, a $1.1 million draw to support the development office and $1.2 million in General Convention income, along with other smaller sources.The expenses sideSpending in the 2016-2018 budget is structured around the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission, as is the current budget.To conform to canonical requirements to designate spending in the areas of canonical, corporate and program, each expense line is coded to one of those three categories, and the budget’s enabling resolution, which does not yet have a number, summarizes the spending in that way.Program expenses are funded at $64.3 million, corporate at $35.2 million, and canonical $22.5 million. The amounts for each category in each year are specified in the budget resolution.There are four kinds of grants in the proposed budget:Long-term development/sustainability grants which facilitate partnerships with dioceses and the rest of the church. For the first time, the budget reflects the operating costs and income for the United Thank Offering board (lines 265-268). Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Out of Deep Waters: Gulf Coast, Episcopal Church remembers Katrina

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events [Episcopal News Service – Gulf Coast] It was Sunday; just six days after Hurricane Katrina had ripped a swath of death and destruction across the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Mississippi. It was time for church.No matter that Katrina had wiped the building known as St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Gulfport from its Gulf-side lot. The Rev. James “Bo” Roberts had not missed a Sunday service since he became rector of the then-123-year-old church in April 1969 before Hurricane Camille knocked the building of its foundation about the same time in August of that year.And so, on Sept. 4, the Sunday of Labor Day weekend, the particle board sign along debris-strewn Church Avenue just north of sand-covered East Beach Boulevard read “Here! Mass 9:30 Bring Chair.”Roberts, a Gulf Coast native, rode out Camille in his home but nearly died. He stayed for Katrina, too.“The reason I stay is because you cannot get back after the storms,” he told reporters that Sunday morning after Katrina. “I wanted to be where I could check on my people and be available to them. Should any of them have died, I wanted to be here for that circumstance also.”Hurricane Katrina hit land along the Gulf Coast twice on Aug. 29, once near Buras, Louisiana, just after 8 a.m. local time with maximum winds estimated at 125 mph, and then near the Louisiana-Mississippi border about three hours later with slightly reduced winds. The storm caused a storm surge of 24 feet to 28 feet along the Mississippi coast and 10 to 20 feet along the southeastern Louisiana coast. In Mississippi, the surge damage extended at least five miles inland and as much as 10 miles along coastal rivers and bays.In Gulfport, Mississippi, and all along the Gulf Coast, Hurricane Katrina pushed a 24-28 foot wall of water at least five miles inland. Photo: Federal Emergency Management AgencyThe Rev. Christopher Colby, who was rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Pass Christian, Mississippi, when Katrina tore away all but the church building’s frame and destroyed four other buildings, recalls saying the 8 a.m. Mass on Aug. 29 “wondering what was going to be left and feeling this incredible fear.” He and some parishioners tried to remove as many things as possible from the campus before they evacuated.“We were staring down the barrel of the gun,” said the Rev. Wayne Ray, who was then the rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Ocean Springs, MississippiThe wooden Gothic church building “withstood all the fury of Katrina,” but their home was destroyed by 18 inches of water and three huge fallen oak trees.Almost as worse as the physical damage was the “enormous sense of betrayal” many eastern Gulf Coast residents felt about the body of water that was almost part of the family and from whom many made their living, according to the Rev. Dennis Ryan, former rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Pascagoula, Mississippi, which was badly damaged but not destroyed in the storm. “All of the sudden this sibling that had nourished us turned against us and killed us, literally killed us,” he said.Even today, many people believe “that body of water cannot be trusted 100 percent and when the indications are there to get out, you better get out,” he said.Then-Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray III and his Louisiana counterpart at that time, then-Bishop Charles Jenkins, spoke by phone soon after the storm. “I only had some vague information, but I thought we’d lost several churches – didn’t know how many” Gray recalled recently. “And you said ‘Well, I think we’ve dodged the bullet.”More than 50 breaks in the levees that hold water out of New Orleans caused 80 percent of the metropolitan area to flood on Aug. 29, 2005. Photo: Jocelyn Augustino/Federal Emergency Management Agency“Right,” Jenkins said. “Then of course, the levees broke. And the city flooded.“And in that moment, I felt as if my ministry had been washed away..There were nearly 50 breaches in the levees meant to protect the New Orleans metropolitan area, from the surrounding water. By Aug. 31, nearly 80 percent of the city and its eastern suburbs were covered by as much as 20 feet of water that did not drain out until into October.The world witnessed televised images of the horrific desperation of the 10 to 20 percent of the city’s residents who either could not or would not evacuate as the governmental response to the storm faltered at disastrous levels.  The storm exposed the city’s racial divides in new ways. Two years after the storm, Time magazine reported that the charges of racial discrimination that cropped up during the botched response to Katrina still lingered.Thousands of people sat on New Orleans rooftops on Aug. 30, 2005, pleading to be rescued after levee failures flooded the city with as much as 20 feet of water. Photo: Jocelyn Augustino/Federal Emergency Management AgencyKatrina was one of the most devastating hurricanes in U.S. history, according to the National Hurricane Center, and the deadliest hurricane to strike the country since the Palm Beach-Lake Okeechobee hurricane of September 1928. Katrina was directly responsible for approximately 1,300 deaths in Louisiana (the majority were people older than 60 years) and 200 in Mississippi, a center report said. It was the fourth- or fifth-deadliest hurricane in U.S. history, after the hurricane that hit Galveston, Texas, in 1900 and killed an estimated 8,000, and the Palm Beach-Lake Okeechobee with more than 2,500 deaths. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says two 1893 hurricanes killed close to the same number of people as did Katrina.The Episcopal Church went into action as the storm began barreling north into the interior of the United States. Episcopal Relief & Development immediately sent emergency funds to the Dioceses of Central Gulf Coast, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Western Louisiana to support immediate needs such as food, shelter and medical supplies.While it is estimated that more than 1 million people left New Orleans in the days before Hurricane Katrina, between 100,000 and 200,000 could not or would not leave. They were stranded when relief efforts failed. Photo: Win Henderson/Federal Emergency Management AgencyRobert Radtke, Episcopal Relief & Development president, had begun working for the organization the month before and was not then, by his own admission, an expert on disaster response. He and the staff monitored the storm’s progress, contacting potentially impacted dioceses ahead of time. “Katrina was absolutely beyond anyone’s imaginations,” he said recently.Louisiana Bishop Jenkins called Radtke, asking him to come be with him in Baton Rouge north of New Orleans where diocesan staffers were attempting to regroup.“This was unprecedented. Episcopal Relief & Development is not a boots-on-the-ground sort of operation,” Radtke said. “We weren’t then and we really aren’t today in many ways, but I followed my instinct, which was to go and be with him.”In the days ahead, the organization helped the diocese build a response. “Those relationships we built there continue to this day,” he said.Dioceses, congregations, individual Episcopalians and Anglicans from all over the Anglican Communion began asking what they could do to help. Some of the relationships formed across the church, relationships that cut through geographic and theological boundaries, exist to this day, 10 years later.Jenkins called the outpouring “incredible,” made even more so by the fact that Katrina hit two years after the Communion was rocked by the General Convention’s decision to recognize that same-sex blessings were a part of the church’s life and its official assent to the Diocese of New Hampshire’s election of an openly gay and partnered priest, Gene Robinson, to be its bishop.Jenkins called outpouring of help “incredible,” and added the givers were not asking if their intended recipients were politically, theologically or liturgically liberal or conservative.“I don’t want us to forget the generous outpouring not only of The Episcopal Church and the tens of thousands of volunteers who came here,” he said. “We are a family. We are a family that sometimes disagrees and disagrees vehemently, but, frankly, when the chips are down, we’re still family.”Gray agreed, adding that in 2006 each of the six Mississippi congregations that lost their buildings raised the percentage of their giving to the diocese because “they had experienced what it meant to be one church, connected in the ways Charles mentioned.“When we are broken there is an access to grace that we don’t know in strength and suddenly grace begins to permeate every part of our lives and the judgmental part of me is broken as well as the church is broken,” he said.As the extent of Katrina’s wrath became clear, the Episcopal News Service began its coverage of the church’s response. ENS reporter Matthew Davies was at St. Mark’s in Gulfport on the first Sunday after the storm. The video above comes from footage he recorded that morning.Today and for the next week, ENS is looking back at Katrina and tracing how the church’s response to the storm has evolved over the last 10 years, and how that ministry has helped transform the communities the church serves.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL August 26, 2015 at 4:26 pm The Archdeacon of the Diocese of Western Louisiana, Dr. Bette Jo Kauffman, has just published a book of her photography and which was part of a interactive exhibit called WATERLINE. The book documenting her photographs following Katrina in New Orleans is out for the 10th anniversary of the hurricane. Check it out!Go to: http://www.blurb.com/user/store/bjkauffmanNote – Mary Francis Schjonberg – this would be really worth a look! Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing The Rev’d T. Whitfield Stodghill, III says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Sue Maxwell says: Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 26, 2015 Katrina+10 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Out of Deep Waters: Gulf Coast, Episcopal Church remembers Katrina Tragic loss, enormous betrayal and new partnerships follow in storm’s wake This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img September 1, 2015 at 7:36 pm This is wonderful. Thank you so much, to Mary Frances and to those interviewed, for sharing these poignant memories. This is important church history. I look forward to the rest of the series. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Comments (3) Tandy Solomon says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA August 26, 2015 at 6:25 pm And Christ Church (Episcopal Church) in Bay St. Louis was also destroyed – had been destroyed in Camille. Our church, St. Paul’s, in Port Townsend, WA adopted the parish as a companion as our town adopted Bay St. Louis as a sister city. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

Presiding Bishop addresses National Press Club on creating a more…

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By Lynette Wilson Posted Feb 8, 2016 Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 February 9, 2016 at 7:39 am I’m puzzled. Did Bishop Curry say anything about the Primates’ meeting and equal marriage? Or does Ms. Wilson, writing for ENS, just not want to go there? I guess I’ll have to watch the video to find out. So much for written reportage. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Presiding Bishop addresses National Press Club on creating a more inclusive society Jeremy Bates says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service February 9, 2016 at 8:12 am Beautiful and inspiring words! My commitment to these goals its strong and it is a blessing to hear them from you. Thank you Bp. Curry. Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] “We shall either learn to live together … or perish together as fools,” Presiding Bishop Michael Curry began a Feb. 8 address to members and guests of the National Press Club.The words, spoken by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. during a 1964 speech in St. Louis, Missouri, serve as a defining quote for the 21st century, said Curry.“The choice is ours, ‘chaos or community,’” said Curry, the latter words echoing King’s fourth and final book, “Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community,” published in 1967. In the book, said Curry, it was evident that King was struggling with the future of the civil rights movement and how to lead a nation – potentially set on tearing itself apart – during a time of racial- and class-strife, and the Vietnam War.Building on the theme, “the church’s role in creating a more inclusive society,” Curry shared his remarks with more than 30 people gathered in the Edward R. Murrow Room of the club’s headquarters.A professional organization for journalists and communications professionals with more than 3,500 members, Curry spoke as part of the club’s regular Newsmaker series, or hour-long news conferences, in which congressmen, government officials, policy experts, organizational and influential leaders address members and respond to questions from the media. Former Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori addressed the press club in 2008.Curry’s invitation to speak came at the recommendation of Susan Hahn, a press club member and a member of Christ Church in nearby Alexandria, Virginia. Hahn attended the event along with other Episcopalians, including the Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, bishop of the Diocese of Washington, and the Rt. Rev. Gene Robinson, former bishop of the Diocese of New Hampshire.On Feb. 7, Curry preached at Washington National Cathedral during an afternoon Eucharist commemorating Absalom Jones, the first African-American to be ordained an Episcopal priest.Curry told those gathered at the press club that he was surprised at his election as the first African-American presiding bishop and primate of the Episcopal Church during its triennial General Convention last June.He said that his election wasn’t the only surprise, however, citing the Episcopal Church’s two mission priorities of evangelism and racial reconciliation adopted by that same General Convention.“Evangelism and Episcopalian” are two words rarely heard together, said Curry, adding that “for the first time evangelism was put front and center for the Episcopal Church,” and that it had made a serious commitment to return to the work of racial reconciliation for the first time since the late 1960s, when John E. Hines was presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.“Those were two courageous acts, and I don’t think any of us really saw that coming either,” he said. “I suspect when you don’t see something like that coming that may well be a sign that some other variable is involved in the equation, which means the Holy Spirit has been messing with us…“We came out of that convention with the Episcopal Church having made a commitment to what I call the Jesus Movement and a commitment to following in the way of Jesus of Nazareth, not exactly knowing how all of this is going to play out, but following in the way of Jesus of Nazareth which is the way of God’s love in this world. And doing it by a way of evangelism and a way that leads to racial reconciliation in our society and in our world.”Curry said he is convinced that King’s 21st century call “to learn to live together as brothers and sisters, is tied up with the truth of this Jesus Movement and work of evangelism and racial reconciliation.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry addresses members and guests of the National Press Club on Feb. 8 in Washington, D.C., on the church’s role in creating a more inclusive society. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceAs British Rabbi Jonathan Sacks points out in his book, “Not in God’s Name: Confronting Religious Violence,” religious extremism is happening in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and that more moderate, centrists voices are missing from the conversation. And the west has largely turned away from its former Judeo-Christian values, instead turning to the idols of the self: the market, consumerism, individualism.“The golden calf of the self has been raised by the children of Israel in the wilderness again,” said Curry in support of Sacks’ belief. “That golden calf, that idol of the self, may well be the most destructive reality in human society. Self-centeredness, selfishness, call it what you will, frankly is a cancer that can destroy us all and left unchecked will destroy the planet.”Curry is encouraged by Pope Francis, he said, in his popularity and his actions toward including everyone; he is modeling a “way of being that is the exact opposite of that self-centered, self-destructiveness, and therein lies the hope.”Jesus, said Curry, had it all figured out, as clearly stated in Matthew 22, that the law and the prophets hangs on loving God and loving neighbor.“Religion is completely and totally meant to be about the love of God and the love of neighbor, and if it’s not about love, it’s not about God…”King, said Curry, understood that love is the way to create “beloved community.”“If I love God with all my heart and all my mind, there’s no room for self-interest,” said Curry.For its part, the Episcopal Church putting evangelism and racial reconciliation front and center, is intentionally looking at how it will approach the work of loving God and neighbor both within and outside the Episcopal Church.Curry spoke of evangelism and racial reconciliation in the context of the love of God and love of neighbor as a path to the “light of the world.”Evangelism is not about bringing people to the Episcopal Church, but about bringing people into a “deeper, abiding relationship with God.”“Evangelism is bringing us back to that God and bringing us back to each other and that’s the reconciliation, and when that happens we do not let children go to bed hungry; when that happens every child has an opportunity for an affordable and an excellent education; when that happens every human being is a child of God and endowed by God with certain inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; when that happens we will lay down our swords and shields by the riverside and study war no more.“We will either learn to live together as brothers and sisters … or perish together as fools. But I’m not in this business because I believe we will perish. I’m in this business because we’re going to learn to live together, and the Episcopal Church is going to help lead the way ’cause we’re part of the Jesus Movement.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tara Elgin Holley says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest February 27, 2016 at 11:54 am America, America, AmericaSeek the home of your American DreamA Party is made for celebrationFreedom is ordained by GodOur Land all that is treasureLiberty is for Grace DivineOur ideals of love are trueThey begin with a wish from our heartsFor Heaven and the Lord to comeLet us live from all Blessings of GodOver our Beloved country and allAmerica, America, AmericaLive in the home of America you dreamed. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (3) Stewart David Wigdor says: last_img read more

Collars on the Corner brings prayer, spiritual connection to streets…

first_img Ann Brophy says: By David PaulsenPosted Jun 20, 2017 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Don Burr says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (10) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Kate Anderson says: June 21, 2017 at 12:36 am Blessings on your wonderful ministry. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious June 20, 2017 at 8:47 pm What an inspiring story of living the gospel! July 20, 2017 at 5:16 pm I feel privileged to know Kevin Stewart and am so proud that the Episcopal Church has seen this need and responded to it in such a concrete and meaningful way. Stephen Stray’s comment is right on – lay people need to join in the prayer as well, and the prayer list helps us do just that. Thank you to all who lift people up in prayer Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Stephen Stray says: Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL June 21, 2017 at 9:57 am While I applaud this outreach effort, and it’s great to see the Episcopal Church reaching into areas we’ve not served well before, we need to remember that it can’t just be the “collars” doing all the work. Prayer and outreach are the responsibility of the entire priesthood of all believers, not just the professional “pray-ers”. This is a wonderful beginning! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab June 20, 2017 at 7:06 pm Wooo Hooo!!! This is awesome! Mary Lee Wile says: Collars on the Corner brings prayer, spiritual connection to streets of Milwaukee Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Clergy members from the Milwaukee area pray with Luria Sampson, center, during a Collars on the Corner session in May at West Center and North 51st streets. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Milwaukee, Wisconsin] Luria Sampson had plans Saturday morning, and they didn’t include prayer – not at first.Driving east down West Center Street in Milwaukee, he was on a course for his daughter’s house, his thoughts focused on her safety in a city suffering through a surge in shooting deaths. But when he slowed for the stoplight at 51st Street, an unexpected sight gently altered his morning travels.Sampson, 59, stopped his car, and prayer found its way into his plans.He turned to park the Pontiac Vibe next to St. Catherine’s Catholic Church, exited the car and, grabbing his cane, walked up to the sidewalk where men dressed in black and wearing white clergy collars were waiting to greet him.It is called Collars on the Corner, a public ministry that an Episcopal deacon and Roman Catholic deacon launched after a Milwaukee police shooting last August. The killing of a black man during a chase by an on-duty city officer, also black, sparked days of protests and unrest in the Sherman Park neighborhood and thrust the city’s stark segregation into the national spotlight.Although the Episcopal Diocese of Milwaukee’s congregations are well represented in the city’s surrounding suburbs, there are no Episcopal churches in city neighborhoods with majority black or Latino populations. Despite lacking a structural presence, the diocese’s commitment to a personal presence in such neighborhoods is embodied by the Rev. Kevin Stewart, the diocese’s missioner for community engagement.Stewart has spent much of the past year growing the ecumenical Collars on the Corner ministry with fellow deacon the Rev. Jim Banach, with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Milwaukee. They invite clergy of all denominations to join them outside collecting and responding to prayer requests, and they encourage churches to host the ministry on their own nearby corners.The intersection at Center and 51st is the unofficial home base for Collars on the Corner. On this Saturday morning in May, the warm sun rose over the sidewalk at the corner where a card table was set up. Taped to the side was a sign that read, “Prayer Requests.” Atop the table, a prayer box invited submissions.“We’d be happy to pray with you right here and now,” Stewart announced.“Yes, please do. I could use a good prayer,” Sampson replied.The men gathered in a huddle as one of them, the Rev. Anthony Luckett of the nondenominational Saint Paul Church, led the prayer. Luckett called on God to bless Sampson and his family and give him strength as he spreads his compassion to those around him.The prayer lasted little more than a minute. After tearfully offering his thanks and shaking hands, Sampson continued on, leaving the men in white collars to await their next prayer requests.Praying here has become a routine Stewart repeats every Saturday morning, as his schedule and the weather will allow. He and Banach teamed up last year after discussing their shared desire to get outside and connect with Milwaukee-area residents in new ways.“My understanding of scripture is Jesus spent more time out on the streets than Jesus did in a building, so we felt that we should go,” Stewart said. “But go where, and do what?”The Rev. Kevin Stewart, the Diocese of Milwaukee’s missioner for community engagement, talks in May about his work on the Collars on the Corner ministry. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceThey settled on this street ministry, offering a handshake or hug and a prayer – and wearing their white collars so their calling and purpose would be immediately discernible to passersby. Banach, who was familiar with St. Catherine’s Catholic Parish, suggested the location even before the police shooting in Sherman Park brought wider attention to the neighborhood.“I thought to myself, it’s busy. There’s a need. This tends to be a pretty proactive social justice parish. I bet if we ask, they’ll say yes,” Banach said. “Then Sherman Park happened.”Three weeks later, they set up their first Collars on the Corner in front of St. Catherine’s. They found people were hungry for personal and spiritual connection, Stewart said. “They were hungry to pray, on day one.”Deacon is force for street-level ministriesStewart, 60, has a track record of addressing hunger. After being hired by the diocese as missioner in 2011, he founded the Hospitality Center in Racine as an outreach ministry of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. The day center, under Stewart’s leadership, became known in the community and the diocese for its success in providing food and services for the homeless.“Kevin has a gift for meeting people where they are, learning and listening to their needs and then building a community to address these needs,” Milwaukee Bishop Steven Miller said in an email to Episcopal News Service.In 2015, with the Hospitality Center well established in Racine, Stewart stepped down to turn his focus to Milwaukee, where the diocese was looking to create ministries that would respond to the city’s sudden spike in deadly violence. The number of homicides in the city hit 145 that year, the most in two decades, and the number of nonfatal shootings had been on the rise since 2010, the Journal Sentinel reported while noting that the causes were hard to pin down. “As a diocese, we are committed to making a difference in Milwaukee,” Miller said. “This ministry of building relationships is the beginning.”Stewart was given the freedom to venture into the community, listen to residents and local leaders and use what he learned to develop new ministries, like Collars on the Corner.That ministry continued to grow in the fall, but over the winter, Stewart and Banach moved it indoors. They distributed prayer boxes across the Milwaukee area, and Stewart now collects prayer requests weekly from 25 locations, including seven congregations and 12 laundromats, from Cedarburg to Waukesha to Racine. He then sends them out to an expanding prayer chain, by email and on Collars on the Corner’s Facebook page.“To maintain my sobriety,” reads one prayer request.Another asks for prayers “for my family’s safety and happiness. I also ask you to pray for my strength to overcome things that bring me down.”Busy corner is Saturday morning hub of prayerThe collars returned to the corners in the spring, with prayer request stations set up in downtown Waukesha, in Milwaukee’s Bayview neighborhood and at multiple anti-violence events in Milwaukee. And while Stewart and Banach work to involve more churches, they maintain a regular presence at Center and 51st.“The beauty of it is we’ve already got some friends in the neighborhood,” Banach said. “They see us out here and they come running.”The Rev. Anthony Luckett of the nondenominational Saint Paul’s Church prays in May with Darren Haywood on the corner of West Center and North 51st streets in Milwaukee. Haywood, 48, has grown used to seeing the men in collars here Saturdays and asked them to pray to stop the violence plaguing the city. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceSome of the foot traffic on this corner is generated by St. Catherine’s Saturday food pantry. Jacqueline Garcia, 46, said she stops by the food pantry once a month, but this was her first time seeing the prayer request station.Stewart prays with Jacqueline Garcia, 46, who was stopping by a nearby food pantry when she saw the Collars on the Corner. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceShe and her friend, Micha Jones, 38, each scribbled their prayers on paper and put them in the box. Then, over the sound of cars cruising by on Center Street and the drone of the lawnmower at St. Catherine’s, they prayed – Jones with Luckett and Garcia with Stewart.By the time they were done, tears were running down Garcia’s cheeks. Jones had been similarly moved by her prayer, and “I don’t cry for nobody,” she said after regaining her composure.Jones said she sometimes attends church services, but not regularly. That tenuous connection to a physical church is common among the people served here, but these sidewalk parishioners need not be churchgoers. The goal of Collars on the Corner isn’t to fill the pews.Stewart recalled welcoming someone on the corner who feared going back to church. The person had been away “too long” and had “done too much wrong.”“Maybe that person will walk inside a church door again, we don’t know,” Stewart said. “But on that day, the church was out here meeting people where they’re at.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release June 21, 2017 at 6:41 am Love this. I have done this kind of street praying. It can be powerful. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 11, 2017 at 9:14 am So diaconal, a living bridge, incarnated — love this! Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Pam Payne says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Robin Kassabian says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bp Greg Brewer says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR June 27, 2017 at 9:18 am This is so very encouraging . . . and the ecumenical aspect of it is “church” as it should be! Prayers for continued success and growth of this ministry. So many other cities could benefit from this. Richard Basta says: June 20, 2017 at 5:51 pm Now that is evangelism without hype or pressure! Bravo to Collars on the Corner for meeting people where they are. June 20, 2017 at 7:57 pm Great ecumenical effort! Rector Knoxville, TN Barry K. Luedloff says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

Appel à l’Offrande du Vendredi Saint de l’Évêque Primat Michael…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Middle East, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest « L’Offrande du Vendredi Saint est un moyen pour l’Église épiscopale de soutenir le ministère continu d’amour et compassion que nos sœurs et frères anglicans mènent à bien dans toute la Province de Jérusalem et du Moyen-Orient », a écrit l’Évêque Primat Michael Curry aux évêques et au clergé de l’Église épiscopale. « Que ce soit pour financer une clinique ophtalmologique à Aden, des programmes pour les femmes, des écoles et des services médicaux en Cisjordanie, l’Offrande du Vendredi Saint améliore la vie de tant de gens ».L’Évêque Primat Curry a adressé la lettre annuelle du Vendredi Saint à tous les évêques et congrégations leur demandant d’envisager d’apporter leur soutien à la Province de Jérusalem et du Moyen-Orient.« Je pense que notre partenariat avec ceux qui gardent vivante la foi de Jésus dans la région où notre Seigneur a marché et initié son mouvement est un aspect important de notre action dans le cadre de l’église universelle », a-t-il écrit.Des informations, y compris des premières pages et encarts pour les bulletins, pour l’Offrande du Vendredi Saint sont disponibles à l’adresse suivante :Pour plus amples informations, veuillez contacter le révérend chanoine Robert Edmunds, responsable du Partenariat Moyen-Orient de l’Église épiscopale, à l’adresse suivante : [email protected] trouver ci-après la lettre de l’Évêque Primat :_______________________________________________________Mes chers frères et sœurs,Je vous salue au nom de notre Seigneur et Sauveur Jésus-Christ.Je vous écris en préparation de la Semaine Sainte et l’accent mis lors de cette semaine sur l’offrande sacrificielle, par amour, de notre Seigneur sur la croix.L’Offrande du Vendredi Saint est pour nous dans l’Église épiscopale un moyen d’aider le ministère d’amour et compassion que nos sœurs et frères anglicans mènent à bien dans toute la Province de Jérusalem et du Moyen-Orient.Que ce soit pour financer une clinique ophtalmologique à Aden, des programmes pour les femmes, des écoles et des services médicaux en Cisjordanie, l’Offrande du Vendredi Saint améliore la vie de tant de gens. Je pense que notre partenariat avec ceux qui gardent vivante la foi de Jésus dans la région où notre Seigneur a marché et initié son mouvement est un aspect important de notre action dans le cadre de l’église universelle.J’espère que vous participerez à cette action. Des premières pages et encarts pour les bulletins et informations sont disponibles à l’adresse suivante :https://www.episcopalchurch.org/good-friday-offering Veuillez adresser toute question sur ce programme au révérend chanoine Robert Edmunds, notre responsable du Partenariat Moyen-Orient, que l’on peut joindre à l’adresse suivante : [email protected] de prendre en considération cette importante contribution à l’amour de Jésus dans toute notre Église et en Terre Sainte. Que Dieu vous bénisse et vous garde toujours. Je demeureVotre frère en Christ,Msg. Michael CurryÉvêque Primat de l’Église épiscopale An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Appel à l’Offrande du Vendredi Saint de l’Évêque Primat Michael Curry pour le soutien au ministère de la Province anglicane de Jérusalem et du Moyen-Orient Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Feb 16, 2018 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more