Bruce not shocked by Cardiff events

first_img “After every victory, this is the man who is on the pitch, clapping the fans, instead of letting the players and staff get their just desserts. He’s out there feeding his ego, he needs to stop interfering and let Malky get on with his job. “If you don’t want Malky there, be brave, man up, face him and tell him ‘you’re going one way, we want someone else to take the club in another direction’.” Hull fans are no strangers to off-the-field dramas and are currently battling owner Assam Allam who wants to change their name to Hull Tigers – a move which carries shades of Cardiff’s change of shirt from blue to red. Allam has told the fans who sing ‘City Till We Die’ that they can “die when they want” as the fallout continues, and the Hull fans’ group designed to prevent the name change has sent its best wishes to its Cardiff counterparts. A statement from City Till We Die said: “City Till We Die (CTWD) would like to offer our sympathy and support for the fans of Cardiff City FC following the latest antics of their owner, Vincent Tan. “While CTWD continue to oppose Hull City owner Dr Allam’s plans to change the name of our football club, we appreciate the backing Dr Allam has given to our manager, Steve Bruce, to ensure that success is achieved on the field of play. “CTWD support the team passionately and Steve Bruce has given us a team to be proud of and we thank him and Dr Allam for that. “CTWD wholeheartedly support Cardiff City fans in their continued struggle to convince Vincent Tan that their team should play in their traditional blue shirts – matching their nickname of The Bluebirds.” Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho said clubs should respect the contracts agreed with managers. He added: “I don’t speak about individual cases, because I don’t know them. Only the persons that are involved in any one of these five cases, plus the Cardiff situation, only they can speak about the situation. “The only thing I can say is that every manager that is sacked is something that I am not happy with. I believe that when you give the job to somebody it’s because you trust somebody and, even if the results are not the results that people expect, I think every manager deserves time to complete his contract and, at the end of it, in a fair way, to analyse with his club if there are conditions to continue or if it’s better to end. “I don’t like people to be sacked in the middle of the season.” West Ham manager Sam Allardyce said Mackay should stick to his guns. He said: “If what they’re saying is true, ‘resign or I’ll sack you’ is not a decision for Malky to make is it? It’s a decision for the owner to make, not for Malky. Malky needs to sit there and what will be will be. “I don’t know how damaging it will be if they decide to dismiss Malky. Only time will tell. Gus Poyet leaves Brighton but goes to Sunderland, Roberto Martinez doesn’t get sacked but gets Wigan relegated but then gets the Everton job. “On what he has achieved it could be that another football club in the Premier League decides that Malky Mackay is the man for them. That’s what I think he would deserve if the situation does happen. Whether it does or not, only Malky will decide whether it has damaged his reputation or not.” Manchester City boss Manuel Pellegrini said it was vital for a manager to have a good relationship with a chairman. He added: “It is impossible for the manager to be successful if the president of the club does not trust in him.” Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger said there is no real secret to his longevity other than he was given more time than most managers. He said: “To be given time is important first of all when you’re a young manager you need to learn the job. Nobody goes in a job at 33, 34 years of age and knows the job. If he’s not given the time somebody else comes in and he has the same problem. “There are some countries where the instability of managers is chronic. After what happens you have no quality anymore because people with quality do not go into jobs where they are sacked every three weeks for ridiculous reasons so it’s very important for the quality of the game that there is a certain stability.” Press Association “From the outside they should be really thanking Malky, he has done a wonderful job. He gets them up, and is making a fist of keeping them up but it’s the industry we work in. “The big successful clubs – the one thing they have is consistency. “I think all of us in this job think it seems to be getting worse, 25 per cent of the clubs in the Premier League have changed managers all ready. “When you look at the lower divisions too the fall-out rate of managers is quite ridiculous and I think we are going to deter people from coming into management, especially up-and-coming young ones, as managers simply do not get time now.” Former Wales international Iwan Roberts played with Mackay at Norwich and is outraged by the developments. “It’s one thing after another. Instead of facing Malky face to face in a room, he sent him an e-mail with an ultimatum,” he told talkSPORT. “Why should Malky resign? He has done a terrific job, got them to a League Cup final, the play-offs, won the league and got them promoted. They are four points off the bottom three. Where did the owners think they would be? Top four, top five? “He (Tan) is living on a different planet to me. Press Association Sport understands Tan has sent an email telling the Scot to resign or else face being fired – but Mackay is adamant he has no intention of quitting. When told of the email, Bruce said: “Oh my gosh – Merry Christmas… But nothing surprises me any more because of the way football has gone. Cardiff owner Vincent Tan should be thanking manager Malky Mackay for what he has achieved and not threatening him with the sack, Hull boss Steve Bruce has claimed.last_img read more

Police off to strong start as B & J Classic commences.

first_imgMUCH was expected from Linden athletes Daniel Williams and Chantoba Bright, and much was delivered, yesterday, with Williams pushing through to a win in the men’s 200m and Bright continuing her rule over the women’s long jump, despite clearing only 5.35m on her best try, at the Mackenzie Sports Club Ground in Linden.However, none of that would be enough to see Linden finish anywhere better than fourthGDF’s Troy Lewis won the men’s discus throw with a winning throw of 41.65mamong the five clubs competing at this year’s Kares Engineering Inc Boyce and Jefford Classic VIII, which began yesterday at the MacKenzie Sports Club Ground.Complete dominance in the relays, backed by aggregate points picked up throughout the other events of the day, placed Police Progressive Athletics Club with a 32-points lead at the close of 12 finals.The defending champions closed with 162 points, one of only two teams to reach triple digits. The Guyana Defence Force followed with 130 points. Super Upcoming Runners enter the second day of competition today in a distant third with 44 points.Linden has 36 points, while bringing up the rear was De Challengers with 18 points.“At the end of the first day I am prond of where we are, and we’re coming tomorrow to finish it off,” boasted Police head coach, Lyndon Wilson.“We’ve covered most of the events and performed in the areas that we wanted to perform in. We are where we wanted to be at the end of the first day. I will say openly that we will be the winner.”Though they shone as a team, however, Police did not make it to the top podium position that often for the individual races.In the fiercest battle of the night, Williams gave his fans just what they came for, with cheers breaking out as the 16-year-old whizzed past the finishing line ahead of the field, leaving Army’s Davin Fraser for second place, and his fellow junior athlete, Tyrell Peters for third.The World Youth silver medallist was in fine form all day, clocking wins in his 100m, 200m and 400m heats earlier in the day. There were those who may have doubted his abilities to still be strong in the 200m finals after such a harrowing day, but he was determined to deliver.The winning time clocked was 21.8 seconds, while Fraser had touched the line at 22.2 seconds, just pipping Peters who had a time of 22.4 seconds.In the women’s 200m Toyan Raymond, with a time of 25.2 seconds, left Police Alita Moore to settle for the second place of the race, coming in with a time of 25.4 seconds.Raymond was second to Bright in the long jump where her top leap took her 5.15m.GDF took the men’s 5000m after Cleveland Forde clocked 16 minutes and 27.7 seconds for the win, continuing to rule over Winston Missigher, who was out representing Police.last_img read more

India will host successful Games: Pak High Commissioner

first_imgParamilitary commandos stand in a group for a security briefing at the Indira Gandhi International Stadium ahead of the Commonwealth Games in New Delhi on Sunday, September 26, 2010.Pakistan on Monday joined the list of countries complaining about the Commonwealth Games facilities, saying a lot still needs to be done to ensure that their athletes are comfortable at the Athletes’ Village.Pakistan High Commissioner Shahid Malik, who visited the Village to take stock of the arrangements being made for his country’s athletes, also met the Organising Committee officials in New Delhi.”There is lot need to be done. Our concern is that when our athletes come they should be comfortable. I can’t pinpoint (the problem),” he told reporters after inspecting the facilities in the Games’ Village.Malik, however, hoped that India would go full throttle to ensure a successful Games.”It is a very big event that Indian government is holding and I’m confident that they would do all (to ensure successful conduct of Games),” he said.”Our players have not come yet. They will be arriving by tomorrow. We have got a very large contingent,” he said.Many countries, including Australia, England, Malaysia, South Africa and Botswana have complained about the facilities at the Athletes’ Village terming it “filthy and unlivable”.- With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

Woman dies of possible hypothermia while heading to cross border into Canada

first_imgNOYES, Minn. – It was just a matter of time until an aslyum seeker died trying to illegally cross the border into Canada, the reeve of Emerson, Man., said Tuesday.Greg Janzen was reacting to the death of Mavis Otuteye, a 57-year-old woman believed to be from the African country of Ghana, whose body was found late last week near Noyes, Minn.“We were always expecting to find someone in the ditch when the snow melted, which we never did,” he said. “(Then) the Red River didn’t flood nearly as much as we expected so we thought it would be clear sailing, but now we have this.”The Kittson County sheriff’s department said an initial autopsy concluded the cause of death was possible hypothermia, though a final autopsy is still pending.The police said they believe Otuteye had been heading to Emerson, which is just across the border from Noyes.Though the two communities are very close together, Janzen said it had been cold and rainy that night, and there were two other weather-related medical calls involving border crossings on the weekend. He said those who travel in the middle of the night can also become disoriented, and the area is sparsely populated.There has been a spike in asylum seekers since the election of U.S. President Donald Trump, with the most recent RCMP figures showing 859 people were stopped between official border points in April.For the year so far, there have been 1,993 interceptions in Quebec, 477 in Manitoba and 233 in British Columbia.Janzen has long been a critic of the Canada-U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement, under which people who have made refugee claims first in the U.S. are turned back at official Canadian entry points.However, it does not apply to people who get onto Canadian soil first, resulting in many crossing fields and ditches and avoiding the official border posts.Those asylum seekers are allowed to follow normal refugee-claim procedures and are usually released and cared for by a non-profit agency until their case is heard.“Until they close this loophole, this is going to keep happening,” Janzen said of the agreement. “What scares me is next winter again.“We’re still getting women and children. What’s going to happen to the children? One of these times the kids aren’t going to make it.”He said he also fears for the safety of his community.“So far our residents haven’t been assaulted, but that’s going to happen yet, too.”Otuteye’s case is currently under investigation by the Kittson County Sheriff’s Office and the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.last_img read more

President Obamas Brackets Apolitical Cautious And Full of Chalk

Every year since his first presidential campaign, Barack Obama has shared his NCAA men’s college basketball tournament bracket with the public, and, for the last five years, predictions for the women’s tournament, too. As he’s chosen teams, many of them from swing states, he’s resisted the urge to play politics with his picks.Obama’s main bracket criterion: the number next to a team’s name. The lower a team’s seed, the more likely he is to overestimate its chances. The president has predicted a far smaller number of round-of-64 upsets than the tournaments have produced, and in the last seven tournaments he’s forecast just one men’s team with a seed below 9 to win more than one game.He also has a soft spot for certain states. The president loves teams from Connecticut, a reliably blue state, and Kentucky, a reliably red one.1Schools from those states get a bump of about 0.7 wins per year in his brackets, compared to the expected performance of their seed numbers. The effect is statistically significant (p<0.05). But that may just be a reflection of Obama’s preference for highly seeded teams: After controlling for seed, no state had a statistically significant effect on the president’s picks. He’s been pretty neutral on states where he’s lived, studied or had family ties, including Illinois, California, Kansas, Massachusetts and New York. (Hawaii hasn’t had a tournament team in the years of Obama’s brackets.)Other public figures have picked brackets, but Obama, a big basketball fan, is unusual in having entered so many of his bracket predictions into the public record2He usually has unveiled them on ESPN broadcasts. — enough to create a sample size bigger than some of the polls used to forecast his election and re-election, and to search for patterns in his picks.To assess Obama’s brackets, I compiled the number of wins he predicted for each tournament team in each season,3There are two groups of exceptions to this list.First, neither ESPN nor the White House was able to supply a copy of Obama’s 2010 women’s bracket, and the link from a Whitehouse.gov blog post about it points to a different ESPN.com bracket. I gathered as much information as I could from press accounts of his Final Four picks that year, plus whatever I could glean from this video clip of his ESPN interview, and excluded from all analyses the 21 women’s teams in the 2010 tournament for which I couldn’t figure out the president’s prediction.Second, I excluded from the analysis any teams that hadn’t yet lost in this year’s tournaments, since we don’t know their final win totals.Here are links to Obama’s 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 men’s brackets, and to his 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 women’s brackets. and compared that number to two benchmarks: How did his picks compare to what might be considered typical picks, and how did they compare to how teams actually performed?The first benchmark was the average number of games that teams with the same seed had won for each tournament, over a period from the first year the tournament expanded to 64 teams41985 for men, 1994 for women. through the year before he picked the bracket.5That calculation was based on data provided by ESPN Stats & Information. I counted only wins from the round of 64 on, since the brackets Obama entered didn’t require entrants to predict play-in games. I assigned each play-in team half its seed’s expected wins, since only half the play-in teams advance to the round of 64.Obama, incidentally, has never picked the play-in winners to win their next game (a questionable strategy), and generally hasn’t picked the outcome of the play-in games, either, though he did write on his 2009 bracket — incorrectly, as it turned out — that Alabama State would beat Morehead State and enter the round of 64 as a No. 16 seed.This measure models the sort of information used by a typical tournament forecaster (or as typical as one in the White House can be): How well have teams of that seed done before?The second benchmark for Obama’s picks was the one used to score brackets for accuracy: how many games the teams won. This is both less and more fair than the first benchmark — less fair because he couldn’t have known how the teams would do when he submitted his picks, and more fair because it credits him for insights beyond the seed numbers.After subtracting either number — expected wins or actual wins — from Obama’s predicted win total for each team, we’re left with two possible measures for his lean toward or away from that team. When Obama picked Louisville to make the final last year as a top seed, the first measure scored that as a big pro-Louisville preference, since the average No. 1 seed from 1985 to 2012 averaged 3.375 wins. But the second measure detected a presidential slant against Louisville, since the Cardinals won the title. Conversely, Obama looks like a Washington, D.C., outsider based on his picks for the capital’s teams: He expected fewer wins for them than their seeds would have suggested. But his picks proved optimistic when the teams underperformed their seeds by a big margin.I now had a set of over 700 teams, each one with two scores indicating whether Obama was hard or easy on each team. I then looked up each team’s home state and ran a series of linear regressions to find whether politics could be driving the president’s picks.My first test: Was Obama backing the states that were most supportive of him, or — for his first bracket — the prior Democratic presidential candidate, John Kerry in 2004? Or, instead, was he throwing some love to the states that were most supportive of Republican candidates, hoping to sway their hoops-mad voters into his camp?Neither, best I can tell. For each year, I took the most recent presidential election data6Election data from uselectionatlas.org. Since March precedes November, for Obama’s 2008 tournament picks, the most recent election was 2004; for 2012, it was 2008. and subtracted the percentage of votes going to the Republican from the percentage received by the Democrat, then normalized the results.7For each election year’s data, I subtracted from each state’s figure the average of every state’s figure. This data normalization put all states for each election year on the same playing field: how far they leaned Democratic or Republican relative to the average state in that year. I then ran two regressions against this score, one for each of my scores of Obama’s picks. And I found no relationship whatsoever.The story repeats for other political indicators that might have steered his picks: whether states were swing states,8I defined swing states as those with a gap of less than 5 percentage points in the previous presidential election between the vote shares of the Democratic and Republican candidates. and the probability that a single voter in that state — perhaps a fan of a team Obama could pick for the Final Four — could swing the presidential election.9Based on work by Columbia University statistician Andrew Gelman and FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver, using Silver’s 2008 presidential-election forecasts; Gelman provided me with a table of probabilities by state. For each possible factor, I ran the same pair of linear regressions.10Technically, I ran two pairs of linear regressions for the probability of one voter swinging the election: One using the raw probability, and one the logarithm of the probability, since the probabilities were minuscule and varied by orders of magnitude. And each time I found no clear relationship.11Six out of the eight coefficients were positive, which would suggest Obama was favoring Democratic states or electorally vital states, but none of the results was statistically significant.There was one highly statistically significant relationship: between Obama’s picks and a team’s seed number. For each improvement in seed of one — say, from 5 to 4 — Obama was likely to give the team a bump of about 3 percent of a win relative to its seed’s expected wins, and about 4 percent of a win more than the team actually won.12Seed was highly significant: p<10^-6. After controlling for seed, all the political factors still produced insignificant effects and half their coefficients were negative, suggesting any hint of a lean by Obama was more a product of seed number. And for each regression, p>0.4.Here’s another way of saying that: President Obama backs favorites to win even more than they have historically. And he’s remained consistently risk-averse, ranging from three to six upset picks in the round of 64 in his seven men’s tournament brackets. He’s never picked a team seeded below 13 to win a game, though six have over those years.13It’s probably imprudent to pick too many early upsets by big underdogs since their opponents are favorites not only to win but to go on to advance far in the tournament. But many fans do pick at least one. The millions of entrants to ESPN.com’s bracket challenge this year and last averaged about one pick per three brackets of a 14, 15 or 16 seed to reach the round of 32.Obama predicted wins for 32 teams seeded 10 and below, from the round of 64 on, for the seven men’s tournaments from 2008 to 2014.14 I didn’t count wins by 9 seeds over 8 seeds as upsets since those teams are so closely seeded. Yet 50 percent more teams have won at least one game. He was especially downbeat about the chances of teams seeded 12 or lower, predicting just eight wins for the group. Some 29 teams seeded that low have combined to win 38 games.Obama’s caution intensifies as he moves through the men’s bracket to later rounds. He’s picked just one team seeded 7 or worse to make the Sweet Sixteen in seven years of men’s bracket-picking.15North Carolina State, in 2012. Obama was right. Yet 27 teams with seeds that low made a Sweet Sixteen since 2008 — including two teams, Connecticut and Kentucky, that qualified for the Final Four on Sunday. Conversely, though nine No. 2 seeds have lost before the Sweet Sixteen, Obama has picked every one to make it that far.16He evidently considered choosing Clemson to upset No. 2 Oklahoma in 2009’s round of 32 but crossed out that pick and went with the chalk — correctly, as it turned out. Obama has backed no Elite Eight teams with seeds worse than 5, yet nine such teams have made it that far. And he’s picked no national semifinalist seeded worse than 4, yet seven Final Four teams have fit that category.When Obama has predicted a men’s upset, he has guessed well. By chance alone, you’d expect that 14 of the teams he picked seeded 10 or below to pull off at least one upset of a higher-seeded team would have done so.17That calculation is based on the actual rates of upsets for each seed number, and how many upsets he predicted. Yet 18 got at least one win — including all five of the 12 seeds he backed. Obama is on the verge of displaying a statistically significant forecast skill in the men’s brackets.180.1>P>0.05.In the women’s tournament, where favorites tend to dominate, Obama’s caution has been merited. He’s picked 12 teams seeded 10 or worse to pull off first-round upsets since 2011,19I excluded the incomplete 2010 Obama women’s bracket from this analysis, in case his picks for the omitted teams deviated sharply from his picks that we know. and 13 have. He’s shown no particular ability to identify upset victims, forecasting three correctly compared to an expected total of 2.4.Obama also seems to like certain teams more than others, though with just 12 of his brackets on record, no team has a sample size large enough to draw broader conclusions. His likes, relative to expected and actual performance, include Baylor, Kentucky, Louisville, Marquette, North Carolina, Notre Dame and Ohio State. By contrast, Obama is hard on Arizona, Gonzaga, Oklahoma, San Diego State, Texas and Xavier.20The effect for Baylor, Louisville and North Carolina is statistically significant (p<0.05) for his picks relative to the teams’ seed numbers; he typically gives those teams one more win than their seed suggests. The effect vanishes, though, for those schools when examining how they did relative to Obama’s picks. In other words, their results suggest he was mostly right when picking them to outperform their seed. The effect is also smaller and statistically insignificant after controlling for seeds, since those teams tend to have high seeds. Adding that control reveals that Obama has been hard on Washington State, to a statistically significant degree: Controlling for seed, Obama has under-picked the Cougars by an average of nearly two wins per tournament, relative to their seed. His view on some schools looks different depending on the measure: Obama seems like a Duke-backer based on the Blue Devils’ results, but his picks have been in line with their seed numbers.Separating his preferences for certain schools’ men’s and women’s teams is especially tough because of the sample-size problem. So it’s hard to say whether he likes Cal’s women’s teams but dislikes their male counterparts, or if that’s just a statistical fluke.Asked about the president’s picking strategy, the White House press office referred to his statements to ESPN when unveiling his brackets.21Here are video clips of Obama’s chats with ESPN’s Andy Katz about his 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 brackets. Obama usually talks about specific teams in those broadcasts, rather than a broader strategy. The country’s chief executive has a soft spot for team chiefs, mentioning more coaches than players in recent years. (He has high praise for Michigan State’s Tom Izzo and North Carolina’s Roy Williams; in 2012, he admitted, “I’m just a sucker for the Tar Heels.”) He likes point guards and teams with momentum. Last year, he mentioned his “Big 10 bias.”22Obama does back Big 10 teams beyond their seed to a statistically significant degree, but the effect isn’t significant after controlling for seed, since Big 10 teams usually are highly seeded. Because of all the conference realignment during Obama’s bracket-picking years of 2008 to 2014, I studied only the conference he mentioned liking and counted only Big 10 teams that were in the conference throughout the period. When Obama does mention a player, he is sometimes motivated by where the player comes from rather than where his school is. For example, he said he picked Duke to reach this year’s Elite Eight partly because Blue Devils star Jabari Parker comes from Chicago. And Obama is aware of his tendency to back favorites. He said this year, “I know these are not imaginative picks, but I think they’re the right ones.”It’s hard to argue with the president’s preference for favorites: Picking upsets incorrectly is more damaging than picking upsets correctly is valuable. And lately, it’s working for him. He picked the women’s champion correctly twice in four tries, got one of the surprising men’s Final Four teams right this year — No. 1 seed Florida — and is in the 74th percentile of ESPN’s bracket contest. However, he may regret taking the relatively daring step of backing a No. 4 seed, Michigan State, to win the title. It was his first time picking a men’s or women’s champion that wasn’t a No. 1 seed, and the Spartans’ elimination on Sunday left him without any chance of gaining further points next weekend. In presidential brackets, as in presidential politics, risk-taking sometimes backfires. read more

Former EPL footballer believes Arnautovic should stay in England

first_imgThe West Ham United player is wanted by Guangzhou Evergrande in the Chinese Super League, but for Paul Merson, he would also be good for Arsenal or Tottenham Hotspur.West Ham United footballer Marko Arnautovic is wanted by Chinese Super League club Guangzhou Evergrande.And former English Premier League footballer Paul Merson says he should not leave England and but should join other teams.“Marko Arnautovic is too good to go to China – but maybe the money is too good to turn down,” Merson was quoted by The Express.“There must be a personal reason why he wants to go because he still has a lot to offer and he could play for bigger teams than West Ham.”declan rice, england, West ham UnitedReport: England’s Rice gets death threats George Patchias – September 9, 2019 England International Declan Rice has received death threats.Rice a one time Ireland International, switched allegiances only this year. The West Ham United man played for…“If you were Arsenal, Chelsea, Manchester United or Tottenham you would take him tomorrow,” he added.“He could play for any of those teams. He’s a really good player and he’s not just a center-forward.”“He could play in other positions too and give you a different option,” he commented.“But you’re playing in front of fans who adore you and it’s a real kick in the teeth for them when it’s a Chinese team he’s joining and not a top European club capable of winning trophies.”last_img read more

Local Police Notice Influx Of Failure To Appear Arrests Following New Legislation

first_imgSgt. Cushman: “We find people who have a warrant and when we go to contact them they are sometimes in the act of committing another crime.” According to Sergeant Paul Cushman with KPD they noticed an influx of ‘failure to appear’ arrests since the first of the year: “We have seen an increase in our warrant arrests, many of those related to failure to appear for their court dates. We don’t have statistical information to say that it’s directly related to any new legislation, but they have seemed to coincide timing wise.” On February 17, KPD reported four separate arrests where they were dispatched to a crime in progress and ultimately arrested individuals at the scene with outstanding warrants. Sgt. Cushman: “Certainly there are a lot more people being released without a bail, and are essentially just given a court date, and are released after being arrested. So, rather than being held in jail until their court date they are being released, and then obviously not showing up “failing to appear” and so warrants are issued for their arrests.” The purpose of the program is to use a data-based, validated risk assessment took to make a recommendation to the court on conditions of release. The recommendation is based on two factors: the likelihood that the defendant will attend their court hearings and the likelihood that they defendant will engage in new criminal activity if released. But, ultimately, the decision is up to the judge.last_img read more