K-12 teachers travel, learn through Egypt Forum program

first_img Read Full Story Each April, eight to ten primary school teachers from around the U.S. travel to Egypt as part of the CMES Outreach Center’s Egypt Forum program. Currently in its fifth year, the Egypt Forum is a professional development program for K-12 educators designed to build leadership skills, engage teachers in Middle East studies through firsthand experience, and assist them in applying their learning in their classrooms, schools, and communities.Modeled on the academic approach to inquiry at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Egypt Forum places a premium on challenging teaching professionals to reflect and build on their own work and share their expertise as educators with fellow participants. Because of its relatively small cohort the Egypt Forum is able to facilitate a customized course of study for each program fellow that answers the needs of his or her specific classroom. Participants define concrete goals for applying their learning to their classroom environment, and work with program director Paul Beran to find the resources and approaches that will address their particular subject of study.last_img read more

Police off to strong start as B & J Classic commences.

first_imgMUCH was expected from Linden athletes Daniel Williams and Chantoba Bright, and much was delivered, yesterday, with Williams pushing through to a win in the men’s 200m and Bright continuing her rule over the women’s long jump, despite clearing only 5.35m on her best try, at the Mackenzie Sports Club Ground in Linden.However, none of that would be enough to see Linden finish anywhere better than fourthGDF’s Troy Lewis won the men’s discus throw with a winning throw of 41.65mamong the five clubs competing at this year’s Kares Engineering Inc Boyce and Jefford Classic VIII, which began yesterday at the MacKenzie Sports Club Ground.Complete dominance in the relays, backed by aggregate points picked up throughout the other events of the day, placed Police Progressive Athletics Club with a 32-points lead at the close of 12 finals.The defending champions closed with 162 points, one of only two teams to reach triple digits. The Guyana Defence Force followed with 130 points. Super Upcoming Runners enter the second day of competition today in a distant third with 44 points.Linden has 36 points, while bringing up the rear was De Challengers with 18 points.“At the end of the first day I am prond of where we are, and we’re coming tomorrow to finish it off,” boasted Police head coach, Lyndon Wilson.“We’ve covered most of the events and performed in the areas that we wanted to perform in. We are where we wanted to be at the end of the first day. I will say openly that we will be the winner.”Though they shone as a team, however, Police did not make it to the top podium position that often for the individual races.In the fiercest battle of the night, Williams gave his fans just what they came for, with cheers breaking out as the 16-year-old whizzed past the finishing line ahead of the field, leaving Army’s Davin Fraser for second place, and his fellow junior athlete, Tyrell Peters for third.The World Youth silver medallist was in fine form all day, clocking wins in his 100m, 200m and 400m heats earlier in the day. There were those who may have doubted his abilities to still be strong in the 200m finals after such a harrowing day, but he was determined to deliver.The winning time clocked was 21.8 seconds, while Fraser had touched the line at 22.2 seconds, just pipping Peters who had a time of 22.4 seconds.In the women’s 200m Toyan Raymond, with a time of 25.2 seconds, left Police Alita Moore to settle for the second place of the race, coming in with a time of 25.4 seconds.Raymond was second to Bright in the long jump where her top leap took her 5.15m.GDF took the men’s 5000m after Cleveland Forde clocked 16 minutes and 27.7 seconds for the win, continuing to rule over Winston Missigher, who was out representing Police.last_img read more

Cockhill Park to celebrate Golden Jubilee

first_imgThere will be a huge celebration in Inishowen on Saturday when Buncrana’s Cockhill Park celebrates its 50th anniversary. The Buncrana housing estate, which consists of 26 homes, is set to host more than 400 people for a major celebration.The day’s events will kick-off at 3pm when Fr Walsh takes mass proceeding on the green in front of Cockhill Park before food is served and live music follows in the evening. As part of the Golden Jubilee celebration, the organising committee published a book on Friday, complete with photographs from Donal Kearney.Visitors have been advised to use available parking at the local school hall and church to avoid congestion.Cockhill Park to celebrate Golden Jubilee was last modified: June 21st, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Andrew Forster confirmed as Bishop of Derry and Raphoe

first_imgVen. Andrew Forster has been confirmed as the Bishop of Derry and Raphoe following a meeting between the House of Bishops in Dublin yesterday (Wednesday). Archdeacon Forster (52), a father of three, succeeds Ken Good who retired at the end of May this year.Archdeacon Forster has been Rector of Drumglass (Dungannon), in the Diocese of Armagh, since 2007, and Archdeacon of Ardboe since 2015. He was previously Rector of Drumcliffe and Archdeacon of Elphin and Ardagh, in the Diocese of Kilmore, Elphin and Ardagh (2002-2007), Church of Ireland Chaplain and Dean of Residence at Queen’s University Belfast (1995-2002), and Curate in Willowfield Parish Church, Belfast, in the Diocese of Down and Dromore (1992-1995).His consecration is planned for Sunday, 8th December, at St Patrick’s Cathedral, Armagh.Andrew Forster confirmed as Bishop of Derry and Raphoe was last modified: September 19th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Final: Texans 27, Raiders 24, Studs and Duds

first_imgClick here if you are unable to view this gallery on a mobile device.Deshaun Watson had the last word Sunday, making enough big plays to lead the Houston Texans to a 27-24 win over the Raiders at NRG Stadium.The game-winning touchdown came on an improbably escape act where Watson threw a 9-yard strike to Darren Fells taking a foot to the eye, with Raiders’ edge rushers Arden Key and Maxx Crosby narrowly missing a sack.Keeping the Texans alive with his arm as well as his feet, Watson …last_img

Rosetta and the Stone

first_imgA historic comet rendezvous mission begins today after ten years in space.The Rosetta spacecraft, launched in 2004 by the European Space Agency, after 5 trips around the sun, is poised to orbit its prey: Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.  The craft will orbit the comet’s nucleus, if all goes well, and then will land a probe named Philae on its surface in November.  Space.com tells about the mission with an infographic.  Interested skywatchers can follow the progress on the ESA’s Rosetta page.Update: Success!  Rosetta entered orbit successfully on August 6.  First stunning close-ups of the comet have been posted by New Scientist, BBC News and Space.com.There aren’t too many “space firsts” left in this mature part of the space age.  Although Giotto photographed Comet Halley’s nucleus in 1986, and Deep Impact crashed a probe on a comet in 2005, and Stardust collected comet dust and returned it to Earth in 2006, this will be the first mission to land a probe gently on a comet surface in an attempt to understand comets better.In 2000, the NEAR spacecraft touched down on asteroid Eros in an unscheduled soft landing at the end of its mission, but communication was lost on contact (see NEAR-Shoemaker page).  The only other solar system bodies on which soft landings have succeeded are the Moon, Venus, Mars and Titan.Another historic first to anticipate will be the first flyby of Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft on July 14 next year.As we reported 1/13/03 before its launch, the Rosetta orbiter contains a disk inscribed with the first three chapters of Genesis 1 in 1,000 languages — a true Rosetta Stone for the ages.  It’s been a decade-long wait; this should be an important and very interesting mission to watch from now through November.  Space firsts are a good occasion to interest children in science.(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Japan almost beats France, draw 23-23 in Paris

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. France won all three previous matchups with Japan easily, but the Tricolors are suffering from low morale after six consecutive tests without a win since the Six Nations. Coach Guy Noves tried to inject some life into the side by making eight changes after the drab loss to South Africa last week, but France was dominated by Japan. France has only three wins in 11 tests this year.Japan, bolstered by an impressive 39-6 win over Tonga in Toulouse, made all the running at U Arena, pinning France in its own half and tearing through the French with panache. But 15 turnovers by Japan undermined its attack.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutAfter trading early penalties, France blew a try when prop Jefferson Poirot knocked on at a ruck on the try-line.But Japan hooker Shota Horie made no mistake, collecting a pass on the left wing to score in the corner. QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Read Next Wizards’ Wall expected to miss 2 weeks with knee injury View comments Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Japan couldn’t finish off the French but achieved its best result against a tier one side since toppling South Africa at the 2015 Rugby World Cup. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:35U.S. urges Japan, South Korea to share intel01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City France’s Baptiste Serin, left, passes the ball during the rugby union international match between France and Japan, at the U Arena, in Nanterre, west of Paris, Saturday, Nov. 25, 2017. APPARIS  — Japan almost beat France for the first time and had to settle for a 23-23 draw in their rugby test on Saturday.Japan scored three tries to two, and the last try in the 73rd minute, the equalizer by replacement prop Shintaro Ishihara. But flyhalf Yu Tamura couldn’t convert it.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Harumichi Tatekawa then had to make a try-saving tackle on France wing Gabriel Lacroix to hold on to the lead, but France grabbed it against the run of play thanks to Francois Trinh-Duc’s second penalty and a Rabah Slimani try on halftime after the French forwards pounded the Japan try-line.France’s lead held up for only moments into the second half, when center Timothy Lafaele fended off two defenders and scored between two more.Tamura’s conversion gave Japan the lead for the second time. Flanker Kazuki Himeno couldn’t extend it when his try was disallowed because of a forward pass.France hit back with a Lacroix try from a perfectly weighted cross kick by Trinh-Duc for 20-15, but Lacroix was yellow-carded in the 61st for taking a player out in the air.Penalties by each side made it 23-18, then Ishihara barged through the middle of a ruck and history beckoned.ADVERTISEMENT Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ LATEST STORIES Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PHlast_img read more

PM Harper failing to fulfill Mulroneys Oka promise on modern treaties

first_img(Mohawks from Kahnawake battle with Canadian soldiers during the 1990 Oka crisis. File/photo) Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsAs the smoke was clearing from the 1990 Oka Crisis, then-prime minister Brian Mulroney wrote to the premiers of the Northwest Territories and the Yukon about the long, hot summer saying his government would be responding to the demands of “Aboriginal people” in four parts.At the top of the list was “resolving land claims.”Mulroney assured the two premiers the issue would receive Ottawa’s full attention.“The federal government is determined to create a new relationship among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians based on dignity, trust and respect,” wrote Mulroney to former NWT premier Dennis Patterson and former Yukon Premier Tony Penikett in near-identical letters dated Nov. 15, 1990.The other issues on the list included, “defining a new relationship between Aboriginal peoples and governments,” also “improving the economic and social conditions on reserves” and “addressing the concerns of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples in contemporary Canadian life.”Throughout the summer-long crisis in Kanesatake and Kahnawake which spread across the country, the issue of comprehensive claims, or modern treaties, continued to crop up as a major irritant from the First Nation side. Pundits and First Nation representatives who appeared on CBC, CTV and other local cable newscasts repeatedly mentioned the need for Ottawa to overhaul its approach to comprehensive claims. APTN did not exist at the time.In response, after the guns, tanks and helicopters faded from television screens, Mulroney began an overhaul of the land claim system. First, he eliminated the six-claim cap on the number of negotiations Ottawa would deal with at any one time. In 1992, the British Columbia-specific treaty table was created and in 1993 former Progressive Conservative Indian affairs minister Tom Siddon unveiled an overhaul of Ottawa’s comprehensive claim and specific claims policies.The LettersDownload (PDF, Unknown)Since then, only four B.C. modern treaties have been settled while First Nations involved in the process have amassed about $500 million worth in loans from the federal government to pay for negotiations. As of January 2013, Canada has issued $1 billion in loans and non-repayable contributions to First Nation groups involved in claims talks which can take up to three decades to reach a final agreement.It’s also emerged that Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet has stalled three modern treaty negotiations for two years.As it nears the end of its first majority mandate and its ninth year in power, the Harper government is only now beginning to address the issue of comprehensive land claims and folding it into a process named to imply a redefinition of Ottawa’s relationship with its Indigenous nations.It’s called the “reconciliation framework” and it was first mentioned by Ottawa in a statement issued by Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt’s office last Thursday in response to the release of a report by former federal negotiator Douglas Eyford.Eyford was appointed last July by Valcourt to meet with dozens of First Nations across the country on improving Ottawa’s comprehensive land claims policy. As his report points out, Eyford travelled well tilled soil. The federal comprehensive claims policy has been updated three times since its 1973 creation. There have also been eight studies or reports on the issue since 1983, including a 2006 report from the federal Auditor General and two Senate reports, in 2008 and 2012.“Many of the issues I have considered are neither new nor unforeseen. The observations, findings, and recommendations of these reports remain relevant and compelling despite the passage of time, legal developments, and changes in policy having placed some of the issues in a different context,” said Eyford, in the report.Comprehensive claims encompass territorial claims, self-government and Aboriginal rights. They are negotiated in areas not covered by so-called “surrender” treaties or numbered treaties. The majority of these claims stem from British Columbia, the North, parts of Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada.Specific claims generally stem from historical grievances over loss of land or the misuse of monies held in trust by Ottawa.Eyford’s report also mentions a “reconciliation framework” and issues recommendations on its possible creation.“Canada’s commitment to reconciliation should be reflected in a new framework that: continues to support modern treaty negotiations, but addresses institutional barriers…provides a rights-informed approach to treaty-making,” said the report. “(It should also offer) other reconciliation arrangements for Aboriginal groups that are not interested in negotiating a comprehensive land claims agreement…and improves the implementation of modern treaties and other agreements with Aboriginal groups.”Valcourt’s office is saying little about its own vision for this new framework aside from sending links to the department’s interim comprehensive claims policy which was widely panned by First Nation groups.In an emailed statement, Valcourt’s office said the reconciliation framework is simply the renamed “framework for addressing Section 35 Aboriginal Rights.” The minister also has no plans to roll anything out soon.“This framework will be developed incrementally and through dialogue with partners,” said the statement. “Over the coming months, we will engage with Aboriginal groups as well as other stakeholders, including those who provided input during the engagement meetings (with Eyford), in order to seek their feedback on those recommendations.”Valcourt’s framework plans, however, are getting a lukewarm response from the Assembly of First Nations.AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde said Valcourt needed to open direct discussions with First Nations on the issue.“Any work on a ‘reconciliation framework’ needs to be discussed directly with First Nations,” said Bellegarde. “We are concerned that this government is relying too much on ministerial special representatives and other agents when the federal government has a duty to engage directly with First Nations.”It all seems a far cry from what was promised following the Oka crisis by the Mulroney government of which Valcourt was once a part.“I have great respect for the peaceful and patient manner in which most chiefs, elders and Aboriginal people have expressed their grievances and my government will continue to work with these individuals to find appropriate measures to respond to the needs and concerns of Aboriginal people,” said the letters, which Mulroney signed. “These grievances raise issues that deeply affect all Canadians and therefore must be resolved by all Canadians working together.”According to a memo sent to Mulroney with draft responses to the two premiers, the letters “were developed in consultation with the Department of Indian Affairs.”The MemoDownload (PDF, Unknown)[email protected]@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Questions about Indigenous land rights in Alberta surround provincial plan to support

first_imgMartha TroianAPTN InvestigatesThe provincial government is moving forward with a plan in northwestern Alberta that has First Nations and Métis hunters and trappers worried about how it will effect them.The “caribou range plan” covers millions of hectares of land. One hectare equals 2.47 acres.Alberta says the plan is meant to address the declining number of caribou.But Graham Courtoreille, 69, from the Beaver Ranch Indian Reserve, near Fort Vermilion, believes the plan has nothing to do with protecting the herds but more to do with the government’s plan to turn his traditional territory into parkland and wash away Indigenous land rights.“Sure it could be good for the Native people but you know yourself the federal government has been trying to take away our treaty rights,” says Courtoreille.“I don’t trust Trudeau, I never trusted his dad, and I don’t trust him.”The woodland caribou are considered threatened under both the federal Species at Risk Act and Alberta’s Wildlife Act.The provinces caribou range plan is home to several First Nation communities and Métis settlements, along with six municipalities. In Alberta there is provincial legislation governing Metis settlements that is similar in many ways to the Indian Act.There are 15 caribou ranges in total in the province. In northwestern Alberta, the area could be affected by four caribou range plans; the Bistcho, Yates, Chinchaga and Caribou Mountains range.The largest range is the Caribou Mountains Range, measuring 2,065,873 hectares in size.Parkland status is one tool government could useA working document at the moment, referred as “Alberta’s Draft Provincial Woodland Caribou Range Plan,” proposes to restore the declining caribou population while meeting Canada’s requirements under the Species at Risk Act.According to one of the province’s primary guiding documents to deal with woodland caribou recovery efforts, herds in Alberta are declining at high rates.But for Courtoreille and for other trappers in the region, the caribou are not threatened.“There’s more caribou than elk and moose in this country,” says Courtoreille.Owen Sabiston, a retired fish and wildlife game warden who worked with the province for 30 years, echoes Courtoreille’s concerns.“I have a problem with them calling it a recovery plan because they don’t have baseline numbers of the caribou in the wild, they don’t know how many caribou there were 50 years ago,” said Sabiston about the province’s Environment and Parks reports.He believes the province lacks scientific proof and does not have any data on the caribou prior to the 1990s.A spokesperson with the Alberta Environment and Parks stated that although one conservation method may include converting some land into parkland, it is only one tool at their disposal. They can also utilize restoration, land-use planning and habitat protection. The province’s goal is to work with each individual community to see what tools are most appropriate.Courtoreille says he just found out about the government’s plan recently.“Nobody knew about it, the trappers didn’t know, [and] there are still people who don’t know nothing about it.”However, the department said it met with First Nations and Métis groups in Alberta in early 2017, along with other stakeholders in the forestry and energy sector and with environmental organizations during their Phase 1 process, which informed the draft plan. Information sessions and workshops were also held in various municipalities and meetings with individual communities upon request.Graham Courtoreille, a trapper from the Beaver Ranch Indian ReserveTrappers scared, caribou fine, say advocatesCourtoreille says there are hundreds of trappers and mill workers scared of what’s to come.Calvin Bulldog, 49, from Beaver First Nation is another concerned trapper.Bulldog’s trapline is near Caribou Mountains, neighbouring Wood Buffalo National Park. It’s a trapline that has been passed down for generations. Bulldog said if he loses his trapline, he will have nothing. He said it was only recently he learned about the province’s caribou range plan. Until APTN Investigates informed Bulldog how much land could be affected in his region, he said he had no idea.The Northwest Species at Risk Committee (NSWAR), a grassroots organization made up of six northwestern municipalities, formed as a means to give local residents a voice to do with caribou recovery, released a news release asserting how the government’s plan could sterilize the region’s resources and devastate its economy.According to the NSWAR, 650 forestry jobs could be at risk, $1 billion of annual revenue in timber harvest, gas and oil fields would be greatly impacted, as well as other industries such as trapping, outfitting and agriculture.“We cannot understand why the provincial government wants to add more park space in our area,” wrote NSWAR chair Lisa Wardley. In northwest Alberta, the province is already home to Wood Buffalo National Park and Caribou Mountains Wildland Park.NSWAR is currently circulating a petition, asking concerned citizens to submit a statement declaring their opposition about the government’s plan and mail it to their provincial and/or federal environment ministers.Chief Trevor Mercredi of Beaver First Nation says his community will be meeting with the province to address their concerns.“From what I’m being told, the province cannot enact any sort of legislation that will impact our rights. But in saying that, we do have our eyes and ears open,” says Mercredi.Province said Indigenous rights will not be affectedThe spokesperson with Environment and Parks said they want to hear all concerns including those from Indigenous and Métis communities and from the Northwest Species at Risk Committee.The province also said they acknowledge the significance of Indigenous and Métis hunting and fishing rights, knowing it is part of their cultural heritage.When asked specifically what will become of fishing and hunting rights for Indigenous and Métis people, the spokesperson said their rights will not be affected“The traditional Indigenous hunting rights are not impacted by any of our range planning. They have that as part of their treaty rights and that’s protected by the constitution. We have no jurisdiction over Indigenous hunting.”The spokesperson also said no decisions have been made as to which conservations tools will apply in the region.The last information session for Phase 2 wrapped up this week, and now the province will move into Phase 3, which will lead to the province’s final caribou management plan.last_img read more