United Biscuits cuts salt content

first_imgUnited Biscuits (UB) has cut salt across its product range with 94% of its products now within the maximum threshold in the Department of Health’s Responsibility Deal.The company has reduced salt content in its McVitie’s Hobnobs by 43%, McVitie’s Rich Tea by 33% and McVities Digestives by 24%, but said its achievements had not been fully represented by the Department of Health.In a statement UB said: “The Responsibilty Deal reporting only shows a positive response when all products in a category have reached the maximum AND average targets. Consequently we show achievement of the targets in just one out of four categories. With 233 products divided between four categories, we have worked hard to achieve sodium reductions using a phased approach that is acceptable to consumers.”The company said that ensuring the taste and quality of its products and meeting high consumer expectations were their “paramount concern”.A spokesperson said: “For a range of biscuits, much of the remaining sodium in our products is in the form of raising agents.  Reducing this will be a challenge as many of the alternative raising agents adversely affect the flavour and texture of the biscuit, which makes them unacceptable. “We will continue to work towards the Department of Health’s Responsibility Deal goals for the remaining 6% of our portfolio that is not already within the maximum target.”Popular UB brand names include McVitie’s, Penguin, go ahead!, McVitie’s Jaffa Cakes, Jacob’s Cream Crackers, Twiglets, Mini Cheddars and Carr’s in the UK.last_img read more

LET THERE BE LIGHTS AT LYIT – AGAIN!

first_imgThey were down. They were up. They were down again and now they’re up again!The new lights at the LYIT in Letterkenny.The traffic lights at LYIT have created more debate than Roy Keane’s appointment as the Republic of Ireland assistant manager.And now they’re back on the agenda again. The traffic lights at the college on Port Road are currently being put back up today.The lights created controversy when they were erected at the start of the current college year.Many claimed the lights were not needed and that traffic flow actually increased in the area.Then suddenly the lights disappeared and many thought the council had decided to take them down altogether. But it transpired the company who put up the lights, Traffic Solutions Ltd, had not been paid for their work and the overall company had gone into examinership.The lights have remained down for a number of weeks but workers from the company are back today erecting the lights again!Let’s hope someone has seen the light after all of this! LET THERE BE LIGHTS AT LYIT – AGAIN! was last modified: November 20th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LYITtraffic lightslast_img read more

Live updates: 49ers beat Saints 48-46 in instant classic

first_imgGAME ESSENTIALS: 49ers (10-2) vs. Saints (10-2) at Mercedes-Benz Super Dome in New Orleans on Sunday at 10 a.m. (PT).TV: FOX-TV (Ch. 2), Kevin Burkhardt (play-by-play), Charles Davis (analyst), Pam Oliver (reporter). Click here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device. Follow along Sunday morning for in-game insights and analysis when the 49ers and Saints meet in an NFC battle in New Orleans.center_img ODDS: Saints -2.5. OVER/UNDER: 44.5.SERIES: 49ers lead …last_img

Out-of-Order Fossils Make Darwinists Wave Hands

first_imgWhen a fossil violates Darwinist expectations, it never falsifies the theory.  It just creates a new round of imaginative gesticulations.Bad, monster, bad:  National Geographic wrote a headline, “New Sea Monster Found, Rewrites Evolution?”  The question mark implies, “Of course not,” even though the partial ichthyosaur fossil found in Kurdistan is “Out of time,” according to Live Science.  Actually, it wasn’t lacking time.  It had plenty of time to create problems for Darwinists:Researchers had previously believed that ichthyosaurs declined throughout the Jurassic Period, which lasted from 199 million to 145 million years ago, with the only survivors rapidly evolving to keep ahead of repeated extinction events. The new fossil, however, dates from the Cretaceous Period, which lasted from 145 million to 66 million years ago. It looks remarkably like its Jurassic brethren, revealing a surprising evolutionary statis [sic, stasis].The fossil “represents an animal that seems ‘out of time’ for its age,” study researcher Valentin Fischer of the University of Liège in Belgium said in a statement.Now, the gesticulation: one evolutionist called it a “ghost lineage” (i.e., “changing very little over millions of years”).  Another called it a “living fossil of its time.” One “never even imagined” it could survive so long.  One said “it shouldn’t be there, but it is.”  The new story will apparently read: “The resulting ichthyosaur family tree suggests these marine reptiles stayed diverse into the Cretaceous, only to go mysteriously extinct 95 million years ago.”  National Geographic is holding out hope that a single specimen won’t “rewrite evolution”.Go, ginkgo:  Speaking of stasis, the unusual tree Ginkgo biloba is a classic “living fossil.”  Because it is the now the “most abundant cityscape tree in the world,” one might be growing in a park near you.  Evolutionists, though, consider it an exception to their rule, “evolve or perish.”  J. C. McElwain wrote in Science Magazine about a new book about the ginkgo tree by Peter Crane:Ginkgo is among Earth’s oldest-living organisms, reaching ages of around 1500 years. It is a “living fossil,” belonging to a family line extending back over 200 million years. It is a symbol of morphological stasis yet incredible persistence, having survived two of the five great mass extinction events in Earth history.Now, the gesticulation: maybe it’s because it invented lignotubers, “among ginkgo’s adaptations that have ensured its persistence and resilience through hundreds of millions of years of global change.”  Funny no other plant borrowed that idea.  McElwain relishes in some tidbits of “subtle” evolutionary change, even though the tree is a “poster child for morphological stasis“.  He puts a positive spin on how ginkgo fossils can “inform us about the tempo and nature of plant macroevolution.”  Then he relishes how Crane makes the most of reverse evolution:He holds that Darwinian microevolutionary processes and contingency can account for most of the patterns observed in the plant fossil record, and he downplays (but does not entirely discount) the roles of evolutionary innovations and environmentally driven macroevolutionary processes. Crane also draws a nice parallel between the trajectories of horse and ginkgo evolution—both belonged to once highly diverse families and both were “winnowed” to a single extant species.The human network:  Categories of early humans are falling like dominoes, now that Svante Pääbo’s team has found more evidence of interbreeding between Denisovans, Neanderthals and modern humans (see 9/01/12).  Elizabeth Pennisi’s report in Science Magazine about a well-attended talk he gave in Germany last week seems devastating to evolutionary attempts to parse out human ancestors to various species and make a tree out of them:With all the interbreeding, “it’s more a network than a tree,” points out Carles Lalueza-Fox, a paleogeneticist from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Barcelona, Spain. Pääbo hesitates to call Denisovans a distinct species, and the picture is getting more complicated with each new genome.Pääbo’s team also deciphered additional Denisovan DNA, both nuclear and mitochondrial, from two teeth found in different layers in Denisova Cave. The nuclear DNA confirmed that both teeth are Denisovan. But, surprisingly, one tooth showed more than 80 mitochondrial DNA differences from both the other tooth and the pinkie bone. These Denisovans, who lived in the same cave at different times, were as genetically diverse as two living humans from different continents and more diverse than Neandertals from throughout their range, says Susanna Sawyer from Pääbo’s lab. Such diversity implies that the Denisovans were a relatively large population “that at some point may have outnumbered Neandertals,” Pääbo said.Now, the gesticulating: Pennisi reported that the evolutionists feel the new data will help clarify “genetic changes that underlie our own evolution.”  They might be able to line up genes from these “archaic people” and find out which are unique to our species, compared to genes of apes and monkeys.  See also the 9/05/11 and 8/12/11 entries.The observations show solid horizontal lines between interbreeding kinds, but dashed vertical lines where the evolution is supposed to have happened.  Where is the tree?  It’s all a tangled bramble bush.  When the fossils don’t tell the Darwin tale, they have to invent terms like “morphological stasis” and wave their hands to keep you from seeing what the evidence implies.  Ignore the waving hands.  If they can’t get the tree right, what makes you think they got the dates right?Pääbo has basically undermined the Neanderthal myth.  Evolutionists give arbitrary names to populations of Homo sapiens, giving them new species designations like Homo neanderthalensis.  Since it fits Darwin’s expectations, it quickly becomes textbook orthodoxy.  Artists go to work to make the new species look as different as possible from us.  But what have we just heard?  “These Denisovans, who lived in the same cave at different times, were as genetically diverse as two living humans from different continents and more diverse than Neandertals from throughout their range.”  It’s all phony baloney categorizing among true humans, whose ability to interbreed proves they are one species.At first, Pääbo and other evolutionists tried that with the bones from Denisova cave, but now is reluctant to call those cave dwellers a distinct species.  How could he?  The DNA is all scrambled, showing they were all members of a single species: human beings.  The people in that cave were smart.  They were networking way back when they lived, just like we do today.  None of them were stupid enough to try mating with apes, or to think that’s where they came from.  If you respect evidence, help toss the Darwin Party out of power.(Visited 92 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

a month agoFormer Chelsea defender Chivers: Kids fighting tooth and nail for Lampard

first_imgFormer Chelsea defender Chivers: Kids fighting tooth and nail for Lampardby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Chelsea defender Gary Chivers believes the club will give manager Frank Lampard time in charge of his young players.Chivers feels the Blues legend will be cut plenty of slack due to his cult-hero status in west London.He told brightonandhovealbion.com: “They’re definitely in a transitional stage, but they will be fighting tooth and nail for Frank Lampard. The kids that have come in, the likes of Mason Mount and Tammy Abraham, who have played at the likes of Derby and Aston Villa, have done brilliantly.“The fans will give Frank a lot of time because he was such a fantastic player and is a fantastic person. Appointing him is the best move Chelsea could’ve made because he loves the club, and knows the ins and outs of the club.“You can see that these players are playing for him. They’re a young side that are going to make mistakes, and Frank will too because this is only his second season as a manager, but the fans adore him and they will give him time.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Questions about Indigenous land rights in Alberta surround provincial plan to support

first_imgMartha TroianAPTN InvestigatesThe provincial government is moving forward with a plan in northwestern Alberta that has First Nations and Métis hunters and trappers worried about how it will effect them.The “caribou range plan” covers millions of hectares of land. One hectare equals 2.47 acres.Alberta says the plan is meant to address the declining number of caribou.But Graham Courtoreille, 69, from the Beaver Ranch Indian Reserve, near Fort Vermilion, believes the plan has nothing to do with protecting the herds but more to do with the government’s plan to turn his traditional territory into parkland and wash away Indigenous land rights.“Sure it could be good for the Native people but you know yourself the federal government has been trying to take away our treaty rights,” says Courtoreille.“I don’t trust Trudeau, I never trusted his dad, and I don’t trust him.”The woodland caribou are considered threatened under both the federal Species at Risk Act and Alberta’s Wildlife Act.The provinces caribou range plan is home to several First Nation communities and Métis settlements, along with six municipalities. In Alberta there is provincial legislation governing Metis settlements that is similar in many ways to the Indian Act.There are 15 caribou ranges in total in the province. In northwestern Alberta, the area could be affected by four caribou range plans; the Bistcho, Yates, Chinchaga and Caribou Mountains range.The largest range is the Caribou Mountains Range, measuring 2,065,873 hectares in size.Parkland status is one tool government could useA working document at the moment, referred as “Alberta’s Draft Provincial Woodland Caribou Range Plan,” proposes to restore the declining caribou population while meeting Canada’s requirements under the Species at Risk Act.According to one of the province’s primary guiding documents to deal with woodland caribou recovery efforts, herds in Alberta are declining at high rates.But for Courtoreille and for other trappers in the region, the caribou are not threatened.“There’s more caribou than elk and moose in this country,” says Courtoreille.Owen Sabiston, a retired fish and wildlife game warden who worked with the province for 30 years, echoes Courtoreille’s concerns.“I have a problem with them calling it a recovery plan because they don’t have baseline numbers of the caribou in the wild, they don’t know how many caribou there were 50 years ago,” said Sabiston about the province’s Environment and Parks reports.He believes the province lacks scientific proof and does not have any data on the caribou prior to the 1990s.A spokesperson with the Alberta Environment and Parks stated that although one conservation method may include converting some land into parkland, it is only one tool at their disposal. They can also utilize restoration, land-use planning and habitat protection. The province’s goal is to work with each individual community to see what tools are most appropriate.Courtoreille says he just found out about the government’s plan recently.“Nobody knew about it, the trappers didn’t know, [and] there are still people who don’t know nothing about it.”However, the department said it met with First Nations and Métis groups in Alberta in early 2017, along with other stakeholders in the forestry and energy sector and with environmental organizations during their Phase 1 process, which informed the draft plan. Information sessions and workshops were also held in various municipalities and meetings with individual communities upon request.Graham Courtoreille, a trapper from the Beaver Ranch Indian ReserveTrappers scared, caribou fine, say advocatesCourtoreille says there are hundreds of trappers and mill workers scared of what’s to come.Calvin Bulldog, 49, from Beaver First Nation is another concerned trapper.Bulldog’s trapline is near Caribou Mountains, neighbouring Wood Buffalo National Park. It’s a trapline that has been passed down for generations. Bulldog said if he loses his trapline, he will have nothing. He said it was only recently he learned about the province’s caribou range plan. Until APTN Investigates informed Bulldog how much land could be affected in his region, he said he had no idea.The Northwest Species at Risk Committee (NSWAR), a grassroots organization made up of six northwestern municipalities, formed as a means to give local residents a voice to do with caribou recovery, released a news release asserting how the government’s plan could sterilize the region’s resources and devastate its economy.According to the NSWAR, 650 forestry jobs could be at risk, $1 billion of annual revenue in timber harvest, gas and oil fields would be greatly impacted, as well as other industries such as trapping, outfitting and agriculture.“We cannot understand why the provincial government wants to add more park space in our area,” wrote NSWAR chair Lisa Wardley. In northwest Alberta, the province is already home to Wood Buffalo National Park and Caribou Mountains Wildland Park.NSWAR is currently circulating a petition, asking concerned citizens to submit a statement declaring their opposition about the government’s plan and mail it to their provincial and/or federal environment ministers.Chief Trevor Mercredi of Beaver First Nation says his community will be meeting with the province to address their concerns.“From what I’m being told, the province cannot enact any sort of legislation that will impact our rights. But in saying that, we do have our eyes and ears open,” says Mercredi.Province said Indigenous rights will not be affectedThe spokesperson with Environment and Parks said they want to hear all concerns including those from Indigenous and Métis communities and from the Northwest Species at Risk Committee.The province also said they acknowledge the significance of Indigenous and Métis hunting and fishing rights, knowing it is part of their cultural heritage.When asked specifically what will become of fishing and hunting rights for Indigenous and Métis people, the spokesperson said their rights will not be affected“The traditional Indigenous hunting rights are not impacted by any of our range planning. They have that as part of their treaty rights and that’s protected by the constitution. We have no jurisdiction over Indigenous hunting.”The spokesperson also said no decisions have been made as to which conservations tools will apply in the region.The last information session for Phase 2 wrapped up this week, and now the province will move into Phase 3, which will lead to the province’s final caribou management plan.last_img read more

California lawmakers ask DMV officials about long lines

first_imgSACRAMENTO, Calif. – Hours-long wait times at California Department of Motor Vehicles offices in recent months have been unacceptable, the agency’s leader told lawmakers at a Tuesday hearing in response to public outcry over the delays.DMV Director Jean Shiomoto told lawmakers wait times spiked several months ago as Californians update their licenses to meet new federal security standards known as Real ID.The agency underestimated how long it would take to explain the new requirements to customers and ensure they have necessary documents, Shiomoto said.Shiomoto asked lawmakers Tuesday for additional money to hire more employees, possibly as much as $26 million on top of the millions in additional funding the agency has already been granted.When Assemblyman Phil Ting visited a San Francisco DMV office in his district last month, he said the line snaking around the block looked more like a queue for rock concert tickets than for people trying to renew their licenses.“I was shocked,” the Democrat told The Associated Press. “What we’ve been hearing are horrific wait times of six or seven hours. That’s unacceptable.”Lawmakers have given the department millions of dollars in additional funding to accommodate higher demand as Californians update their licenses to comply with the federally mandated security upgrades.The federal law was enacted in 2005 in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and requires new ID cards to carry special markings.After Oct. 1, 2020, airport security checkpoints won’t accept non-compliant cards. Californians must apply for new cards in person at DMV offices.The department has already hired hundreds of additional employees to handle increased demand. The agency is also encouraging people to complete some paperwork before arriving in person and is piloting text message alerts for waiting customers.Assemblyman Phillip Chen is requesting an audit of the department and how it is handling the Real ID changes. The top complaint he’s heard from his constituents recently is about the long wait times at DMV offices.“We want to make sure we’re not putting money into a broken system,” the Diamond Bar Republican said.The Joint Legislative Audit Committee will weigh Chen’s audit request Wednesday.To ease the long wait times, the DMV is staffing 60 offices on Saturdays and extending morning hours at 14 offices.“We want to do better and we will do better,” Shiomoto said. “Our customers deserve it.”last_img read more

Pomeroy Sport Centre to begin installing ice

first_imgDue to the poor air quality, the city is urging residents to use the walking track at their own risk.The city apologized for any inconvenience this will cause residents. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Pomeroy Sport Centre will soon begin the process of putting the ice back in the arena.Ice Maintenance will commence on August 3rd and finish on the 16th.The City of Fort St. John Recreation explained in a post on Facebook that many machines will be operated at various times in the Pomeroy during the maintenance which could cause poor air quality.last_img

Dawson Creek RCMP investigate fire in Pouce Coupe

first_imgPolice say multiple vehicles that were parked near the building were also engulfed in flames.It is believed the building was vacant and no one was inside the building or vehicles at the time of the fire.The highway was shut down temporarily and an alternate route was set up until the fire was under control.The area was secured by police pending further investigation.If you have any information, you are being asked to contact the Dawson Creek RCMP at 250-784-3700 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS. POUCE COUPE, B.C. – Dawson Creek RCMP received a report of a structure fire in Pouce Coupe on the morning of June 5 at 4:10 a.m.According to RCMP, officers arrived on scene and determined that the structure on fire was located in a work yard at 5012 Highway 2.Fire crews were on scene trying to keep the fire under control.last_img read more

EC replaces Central police observer in Bengal

first_imgKolkata: The Election Commission of India (ECI) has removed K K Sharma, retired BSF director general and a 1982-batch officer of the Indian Police Service, as the Special Central Police Observer for Bengal and Jharkhand on Thursday. He has been replaced by Vivek Dubey, a 1981-batch officer of the Indian Police Service.The Special Central Police Observers oversee the deployment of the Central Forces during elections and other security-related issues. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsSharma will be the Special Police Observer for Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. However, no explanation has been given by the ECI over Sharma’s transfer. Earlier, the Trinamool Congress wrote a letter to the ECI seeking its intervention over the appointment of Sharma for his alleged connection with the RSS. While addressing the media to release the election manifesto of the TMC, party chief Mamata Banerjee said on Wednesday: “I have respect for the Election Commission of India but how could they send an officer who is so close to the RSS. Such actions force people to question the integrity of the ECI.” Banerjee showed a photograph of Sharma in uniform attending a meeting of the RSS to the mediapersons as well.” On Thursday, Dubey replaced Sharma. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from ThursdayTrinamool Congress has also sent a letter to the ECI against R K Mitra, retired joint secretary of the Home Ministry for trying to manipulate the Central Forces and use them to canvas for the BJP. Mitra’s wife is contesting with a BJP ticket in the ensuing Lok Sabha polls. “Though he is a retired officer of the Home Ministry but he continues to serve the department on a contractual basis and is involved in the deployment of the Central Forces,” Banerjee had said on Wednesday.last_img read more