‘If you asked me, I’d say no’: Jokowi personally against repatriation of Indonesian IS members

first_imgPresident Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has voiced his personal disapproval of the idea of repatriating Indonesian nationals who belonged to the Islamic State (IS), although he added that a Cabinet meeting would be held to discuss the matter further.             “If you asked me, before the Cabinet meeting, I would say no [repatriation], but it will be [discussed] in the Cabinet meeting,” said Jokowi at the State Palace on Wednesday.“We will calculate in detail the pluses and minuses, and the decision will be made after hearing from relevant ministries,” he added. Some 660 Indonesian citizens have been identified as foreign terrorist fighters who have pledged allegiance to IS and joined the movement in Syria and surrounding countries.Coordinating Legal, Political and Security Affairs Minister Mahfud MD separately conveyed a view similar to Jokowi’s, saying that he personally disagreed with the idea of repatriating Indonesian citizens who went abroad to join IS.“I agree that they should not be repatriated because they could pose a danger to the country, and in legal terms, their passports could be revoked as they went there [to IS territory] illegally,” he said.Mahfud said that many countries from which foreign terrorist fighters departed have yet to repatriate their citizens with the exception of certain special cases.He added, however, that the government was still considering the legal and constitutional aspects of transnational terrorism, particularly related to its citizens who joined terrorist movements abroad.Topics :last_img read more

Why the death of George Floyd has resonated throughout the NBA

first_imgLegions of fans have been waiting for months to see NBA players gather again in the same building — but not like this.The scene at Minneapolis City Hall was grim and somber, as Stephen Jackson — flanked by Karl-Anthony Towns, Gary Trent Jr. and Josh Okogie among others — spoke passionately and painfully about George Floyd, the man he called “my twin” for their close physical resemblance.Floyd’s death is now famous nationwide after a video was released showing his arrest: While Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin pinned him to the ground with his knee across Floyd’s neck, Floyd complained that he couldn’t breathe before eventually appearing to pass out. Bystanders asking Chauvin to stop the chokehold were largely ignored. Floyd was later pronounced dead at a local hospital.“A lot of times, when police do things they know that’s wrong, the first thing they try to do is cover it up, and bring up their background to make it seem like the (expletive) that they did was worthy,” said Jackson, a 14-year NBA vet who once played for the Clippers. “When was murder ever worthy? But if it’s a black man, it’s approved.” “We’re not here designed only to entertain,” Rose added. “We’re actually living and breathing human beings that have a multitude of intelligence, work ethic, discipline and talent.”Recent years have seen the NBA’s biggest stars make efforts to expand the scope of their influence, perhaps no one moreso than the Lakers’ LeBron James. His media company Uninterrupted carries the tagline: “More Than An Athlete.” He famously has skirmished with conservative show host Laura Ingraham, who once advised him to “shut up and dribble” (James later backed a documentary by the same name about the history of social activism in sports).In the last few days, James has tweeted frustration about the death of Floyd, posted a photo of himself wearing an “I CAN’T BREATHE” T-shirt from when Eric Garner died in 2014, and posted workout videos of himself listening to hip-hop group Public Enemy’s “Fight The Power.”But James is far from the only NBA luminary to weigh in, and not all are black: Golden State Steve Kerr tweeted early in the week that he believed the Floyd video showed a case of murder. In an interview with Yahoo Sports, Kerr underlined that the black community needs white advocates to help enact real change.“I think most people in my circle can talk about this stuff and we are horrified. And then we move on. Move on to the next day,” Kerr said. “Human nature is to live your own life, take care of yourself, take care of your family. When you see something horrifying, you wanna do something about it. But when you don’t live it, when it’s not in your backyard, not your children, it’s easier for things to slide by. Even when people are outraged.”Related Articles AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThe momentum of outrage of Floyd’s death, however, has spurred consequences: Four officers involved in the arrest were fired; as of Friday, Chauvin had been arrested and charged with third degree murder. Protests sparked throughout the country, with at least seven people shot in Louisville and the destruction of a police precinct in Minneapolis. Public officials have been caught between attempting to empathize with the frustration of citizens tired of the deaths of black people at the hands of police, while also hoping to maintain a sense of order as riots have escalated.While NBA stars have long been vocal about this particular issue, perhaps most memorably dating back to the death of Trayvon Martin in 2012, the NBA is particularly close to this case. In addition to being Jackson’s friend, Floyd died in Minneapolis, an NBA market. While in another year, the NBA playoffs might keep some occupied from speaking out on social issues, with the league on hiatus, off-court interests are especially piqued, and frustration is being expressed throughout the NBA about Floyd’s death and other similar cases in the last few months.The scale of these responses has spread throughout whole organizations: In an internal memo reported by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Atlanta Hawks announced they would bring in a diversity expert to conduct a workshop for company employees, and invited anyone disturbed by the high-profile deaths to speak out. But many are reacting as individuals, as concerned citizens dismayed by what they see as a chronic injustice.“It’s a sad thing to see young minorities being murdered on camera by people supposed to protect us,” Lakers guard Quinn Cook told Southern California News Group. “You don’t know what can happen. We need to pray for our country, pray for George Floyd and his family, and we have to keep being a voice for reason.”There’s an inherent tension for black athletes between the game and league that has helped them become famous, and the reality that many black people still face profiling and excessive violence for the color of their skin. On “Get Up” on ESPN, former player Jalen Rose spoke to the juxtaposition: “I wish America loved black people as much as they love black culture. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more