Boat Builder Becomes Designated Trade

first_imgBoat yards in the province will soon be better equipped to handle increasing demand for Nova Scotian vessels. The province has established boat building as a designated trade, which will provide a clear learning path for aspiring boat builders and training standards for the industry. “Nova Scotia’s boat builders are known throughout the world for building safe, seaworthy boats, and we want to attract more people to this thriving industry,” said Education Minister Jamie Muir. “As demand for Nova Scotia-built vessels increases, the boat-building industry needs more workers to fill orders. We’re responding with a customized apprenticeship program and by introducing provincewide standards for boat-building professionals.” Since 1998, sales in the Nova Scotia boat-building industry have increased from $50 million to $85 million. During this time, employment in the industry grew from 550 to 800 full-time, year-round positions, with an additional 250 positions available in support industries. In April, the Department of Education and the Nova Scotia Boatbuilders Association announced plans to begin using apprenticeship training materials from the New Zealand Boating Industry Training Organization. The materials are currently being customized for Nova Scotia boat yards. To date, there are 24 industry mentors signed on to implement the industry training plan in 12 boat yards across the province. “There is growing demand in the U.S. for fine pleasure boats based on proven Nova Scotia hull designs,” said Tim Edwards, executive director, Nova Scotia Boatbuilders Association. “This new market, along with the continued demand for safe, practical working boats for the fishery, means the need for skilled craftspeople in Nova Scotia’s boat-building industry is growing every day. Trade designation means we can introduce a specific training path for apprentices and provides us with a regulatory framework to ensure consistency in our industry.” After 15 years as a residential carpenter in Yarmouth, Fraser Challoner was one of 32 people to register for the Nova Scotia apprenticeship boat-building pilot program last September. Mr. Challoner works at Wedgeport Boats. “The pilot program was launched just as I was looking for new career options. It meant I didn’t have to put my life on hold to learn the trade,” said Mr. Challoner. “It was a big change to go from building houses to building lobster boats, because nothing is square and nothing is level. Building boats focuses more on angles and curves, and we work on the electrical and fibreglass components, which is new and interesting for me.” For a trade to become designated, industry must apply to the Provincial Apprenticeship Board, which reviews the request and invites public consultation before making a recommendation to government. Designated trades are regulated by the Nova Scotia Apprenticeship and Trades Qualifications Act and general regulations. Under this act, government works with industry to provide formal training and issue a certificate of qualification to apprentices who complete a training program. The Department of Education’s role in apprenticeship training and trade designation is part of the government’s Skills Nova Scotia initiative. That initiative is dedicated to building Nova Scotia’s skilled workforce by providing education and training opportunities. More information about Skills Nova Scotia and copies of the recent annual report and action plan are available on the website at http://skillsnovascotia.ednet.ns.ca .last_img read more

CocaCola names Quincey as next CEO Kent stays as chairman

by Joseph Pisani, The Associated Press Posted Dec 9, 2016 7:03 am MDT Last Updated Dec 9, 2016 at 1:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent will step down from that role next year and be succeeded by the company’s No. 2 executive, at a time when people are drinking less sugary soda including its flagship Coke drink.Chief Operating Officer James Quincey, long expected to become the next CEO, will take over leadership of the world’s largest beverage maker on May 1, the company said Friday. Kent will remain as chairman of the board.Quincey, who’s worked at Coca-Cola for about two decades, has led its drive to cut down the sugar in its drinks and said Friday that he’ll continue to do that as CEO. He also said he’ll keep pushing for more low-calorie beverages and for offering soda in smaller cans and bottles.He said he wants to “stay relevant” with customers by continuing to “digitize” the business, selling Coca-Cola’s drinks online, through food delivery companies and any other platform customers go to in the future.“The iPhone didn’t exist when Muhtar became CEO,” Quincey said.The Atlanta-based company has been diversifying its drinks to try to adapt to changing tastes. U.S. sales volume for regular Coke is down 14 per cent over the past decade, according to the industry tracker Beverage Digest, while Diet Coke’s volume is down 29 per cent.So last year Coca-Cola rolled out nationwide a milk drink called Fairlife that it said had more protein and less sugar than regular milk. It also makes Sprite, Fanta and Dasani water, and has invested in options like bottled teas that have bigger growth potential.The company is in the midst of selling off its bottling businesses to independent companies who will handle the bottling of sodas and its other drinks. This means less revenue, but fewer costs, for Coca-Cola as it focuses on selling syrups and concentrates to the bottlers as well as expanding its brands. Coca-Cola’s annual revenue has fallen in the past four years and Wall Street analysts expect revenue for the current year to fall about 5 per cent from the year before. In October, the company said its third-quarter profit fell 28 per cent.Quincey, 51, spent much of his career with the company in Latin America and was named president and chief operating officer last year. Wall Street analysts said they had expected Quincey to be promoted to the top job, but some thought it would be announced early next year.Analysts at Stifel said “job one” for Quincey is to improve revenue growth. Shares of The Coca-Cola Co. rose $1.06, or 2.6 per cent, to $42.04 in afternoon trading Friday.Kent, 64, will continue as chairman of the board after he steps down as CEO. He has been CEO for more than eight years and first joined the company nearly 40 years ago.Coca-Cola is the second beverage company to announce a CEO change in the past several days. Last week, Starbucks Corp. said Howard Schultz will step down as CEO next year and stay on as the coffee chain’s executive chairman.Change is also coming to Coca-Cola’s board. It had said Thursday that Howard Buffett, the son of billionaire investor Warren Buffett, would retire from the board and not seek re-election next year. Analysts at Bernstein were concerned it could signal that Warren Buffett, whose holding company Berkshire Hathaway Inc. is Coca-Cola’s largest shareholder, could sell Coke stock.Warren Buffett didn’t mention his stake Friday but said he was pleased with the CEO succession plans.“I know James and like him,” Buffett said in a statement, “and believe the company has made a smart investment in its future with his selection.”___This story has been corrected to say that Kent has been CEO for more than eight years, not seven. Coca-Cola names Quincey as next CEO, Kent stays as chairman The Coca-Cola logo appears above the post where it trades on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. Coca-Cola said Friday that CEO Muhtar Kent will step down as CEO next year and be replaced by Chief Operating Officer James Quincey. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) read more